The Department of Physics and Astronomy hosts a unique group of scientists and supporting staff addressing problems in physics, from the smallest scales of elementary particles, via the 'human' scales of climate dynamics, to the largest scales of cosmology.

The department has a long history of excellence in physics research and education. Today, we consist of about forty tenured staff which excel in research on topics such as String Theory, Cosmology, Hard- and Soft- Condensed Matter Physics, High-Energy Physics, Nanophotonics and Climate Physics. About fifty graduate and more than a hundred undergraduate students start each year in the broad Bachelor's programme and the four specialised Master's programmes.

The role of physics in society is expected to increase even more in the (near) future. The application of physical concepts and methodologies will remain important to drive innovations in industry. In addition, physicists will make major contributions to the development of research fields such as biology, sociology, health sciences and economy. As head of this department, I see it as my task to nurture and encourage current departmental strengths, but also to stimulate new, interdisciplinary research themes such as biophysics and complexity research.

I encourage you to explore our website and learn more about the research, educational and outreach activities within the department.

- Henk Dijkstra, head Department of Physics

News

Professor Wolfgang Ketterle
27 September 2017
Prof. Wolfgang Ketterle (MIT, Nobel Prize in Physics 2001) will give a lecture titled: New forms of matter near absolute zero temperature.
Nicolaas Bloembergen
7 September 2017
Nicolaas Bloembergen, who passed away this week, studied Physics at Utrecht University
StratoClim project - research aircraft M55 Geophysica
1 August 2017
Climate researcher Thomas Röckmann investigates air at altitudes up to 20 km
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Events

25
Sep
25 September 2017 14:30 - 15:30
PhD defense of Niklas Gergs
27
Sep
27 September 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Prof. Wolfgang Ketterle (MIT, Nobel Prize in Physics 2001) will give a lecture titled: New forms of matter near absolute zero temperature.
RSS