How do social and economic disparities arise between and within countries?

The Economic and Social History research group is focused on long-term developments in the world economy and societies, from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Our central research questions are: How do social and economic disparities arise between and within countries? How have these developed and how can they be explained?

In order to answer these questions we chart the long-term development of various regions of the world. We do this by looking at various indicators of economic and welfare development such as institutions, the degree of interaction with the global market, geographical aspects, culture and religion.

Comparative perspective

Our research method is characterised by the comparative perspective in which the Dutch 'case study' plays a major role. The Netherlands – or more accurately 'the Low Countries' – is a special case in world history. As far back as the late Middle Ages and early modern period, the Netherlands already displayed many 'modern' aspects such as social equality, a strong civil society, well-protected property rights and periods of rapid economic growth. By analysing the development of the Dutch economy and society we attempt to gain an understanding of these patterns of modernisation, which we can then compare with other areas in the world.

Interdisciplinarity

A second characteristic of our research method is its interdisciplinary nature: we use quantitative historical data to test theories from the social and economic sciences. Much of the research takes an in-depth look at various aspects of social and economic development. We examine financial markets, life expectancy and sex ratio, how the polders were governed and how the Dutch dealt with disasters. We also pay much attention to the recent history of the Dutch business sector, in collaboration with representatives from the sector.

News

29 August 2017
Elise van Nederveen Meerkerk has been appointed as special professor Comparative History of Households, Gender and Work at Radboud University Nijmegen.
© iStockphoto.com/aldomurillo
7 July 2017
The central question within JOIN is how we prevent exclusion and strengthen meaningful participation of all young people in society.
© iStockphoto.com/frantic77
29 March 2017
Michail Moatsos applied globally a promising alternative that avoids the widely applied, but erroneous, assumptions of the fixed 1.9$/day dollar-a-day method.
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Events

Sint Jacobskerk in Utrecht (1780) - Centraal Museum Utrecht. Bron: Wikimedia Commons/T. Schollen
10 January 2018 10:30 - 11:45
Wim van Schaik finds that the typical Dutch 'poldermodel', that was said to have vanished after 1795, had a longer life in the Utrecht countryside.
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Groepsportret van Economische en Sociale Geschiedenis. Foto: Marijn Smulders
Areas of expertise: business history | polder model | history of the creative industry | business models and strategies | collective action | citizenship | the Dutch Golden Age | commons | self-governance | financial markets before 1800 | Dutch East India Company