Early Modern Literature

Research and education at Utrecht University in the field of early modern literature is organised within the Utrecht Centre for Early Modern Studies (UCEMS), where literary historians work together with historians, art historians, musicologists and linguists.

The study of early modern literary culture focuses on literary texts written in a wide range of languages. Utrecht University houses literary historians of early modern Latin, Dutch, English, French, German, Irish, Italian, Latin, Welsh, and comparative literature.

Their work reflects a special attention for the sources (digitalisation and printed books) and the cultural context of the early modern circulation of texts. The Utrecht scholars of early modern literary cultures also engage with the present-day audience, providing opportunities to understand the impact of key texts of the early modern culture within the European context of the building of storehouses of knowledge, civic education and institutional development. This focus fits in with Utrecht University's strategic research theme Institutions for Open Societies.

News

17 September 2018
In August the book 'The Cambridge Companion to the Dutch Golden Age' has been published by Cambridge University Press.
Gerard Dou, Old woman reading (portrait of Rembrandt’s mother), c. 1631-32. Bron: Rijksmuseum.nl
29 January 2018
From 18 March till 1 April 2018, historian Andrew Pettegree will be in Utrecht as a visiting fellow of the Centre for the Humanities.
19 December 2017
"Ancient Models in the Early Modern Republican Imagination" approaches the early modern republican political imagination from a fresh perspective.
8 December 2017
This work explores the relationship between law and drama in Europe between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries. Co-edited by Katell Lavéant.
27 October 2017
Co-edited by Jeroen Salman, this book demonstrates how materiality, sociality and spatiality contribute to a better understanding of early modern book history.

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Prof. dr. Els Stronks
Prof. Els Stronks delivering a lecture at the National Library of the Netherlands, The Hague