Neuroscience and Cognition specific courses

Advanced fMRI analyses

Period (from – till): 4 Febuary 2019 - 8 March 2019 and 11- March 2019 - 12 April 2019

Course coordinator: Dr. Mathijs Raemaekers
E-mail: m.raemaekers-2@umcutrecht.nl 
Brain Center Rudolf Magnus
University Medical Center Utrecht

Course description
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is one of the major methods for measuring neural activity in humans, and techniques for processing and analysing the data are under constant development. Basic understanding of analysis techniques is not only relevant for students who are planning to work with fMRI data, but also necessary for critical evaluation of existing literature.  The course will provide students with hands-on experience with various standard and advanced fMRI techniques, using existing software packages such as SPM12, GIFT, and CARET. Included techniques are:
- the fMRI preprocessing steps (realignment, coregistration, slice-timing correction, normalization)
-The General Linear Model (statistical analysis of individual and group data and the statistical inference)
- Model free data analysis (Principal and Independent Component Analysis)
-Classifying brain states (Machine Learning/Support Vector Machines and Correlation Analysis)
-Surface Based Analysis (Making and transforming 3D brain models e.g. for flatmapping)
There is a strong focus on practical application, where a theoretical background is immediately following by practical application during combined lecture/workgroup sessions. In addition, students get home assignments to analyse data individually.
The student must have a laptop with an installation of MATLAB 2007a or later. MATLAB with a student’s license can be obtained from https://students.uu.nl/gratis-software
 
Literature/study material used:
-SPM12 starters Guide
-GIFT Manual
-CARET Manual
-Reader fMRI preprocessing & analysis
Course material will be provided as PDF’s before the start of the course.

Registration:
Apply via the study guide.

Mandatory for students in Master’s programme:
No

Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.

Prerequisite knowledge:
Basic Statistical Knowledge

Bioinformatics in neuroscience: A Web-based Approach

Period (from – till): 19 November - 30 November 2018
Please Note: this course has changed from a 1 week (1,5 ECTS) to a 2 week (3 ECTS) course.

Course coordinator: Prof.dr. Roger A.H. Adan
Faculty
Prof.dr. R.A.H.Adan
Prof.dr. J.P.H. Burbach
Dr. K. van Eijk
Prof dr. J. H. Veldink
Course description
Every day one lecture followed by hands-on computer practical; each day finishes with a keynote lecture.
During the course there is an assignment with a final presentation (which will be assessed) and an exam.

This course provides an overview of multiple genetic tools used by neuroscientist, including: brain atlases, analysis of proteome/interactome data, GWAS/WebQTL/Phenotype analysis; (single cell) RNAseq.
Central theme: neurological and psychiatric diseases (Autism, Eating disorders, Schizophrenia, ALS, Epilepsy and Mental Retardation).

Literature/study material usedCourse Modules (all web-based)

  • Expression
  • Networks
  • Genetics

Registration
Apply via the study guide.
Mandatory for students in Master’s programme
No.
 Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.

Prerequisite knowledge:
Biomedical Sciences/Biology

Communication in Neuroscience

Period (from – till): during whole year, 19 november 2018 - 30 november 2019 (parttime)
Course coordinator:
dr. G.M.J. Ramakersdr. M de Krom
Course description
Elective course in the Master Neuroscience & Cognition. Capacity: 14 students (6 and 8)Overall aim
Scientific results in the field of neuroscience are often disseminated as publications in a journal or presented during symposia. Writing and presenting of scientific data are skills that are trained during the internships and thus integral part of the Master’s educational program. This course goes one step further and aims to educate students in the organization of symposia and/or the publishing and reviewing process of scientific papers. This is not only useful for those aspiring a scientific career where eventually (usually as senior scientist) they are expected to be able to perform these tasks, but also for students who are interested in a future as professional conference organizer or in the scientific publishing business. Description of the courseAt the start of the course, students indicate which track they would like to pursue, i.e. conference organization or scientific publishing. For the conference organization track 8 positions are available and for the scientific publishing track 6.The conference organization track organizes an annual two-day symposium meant for fellow Master students. Students who choose this track are guided by an experienced tutor (Mariken de Krom) through the entire process of putting together a challenging scientific program, inviting speakers, organizing a poster session, seeking sponsors, managing organizational aspects (registration, travel and accommodation for speakers, reserving a hall, slide presentations etc), pr via the website (www.mindthebrain.org) and keeping a budget. At the end, each student writes an evaluation that contains: a detailed description of the student’s task within the track, a SWOT analysis of the task and a time investment report, that is sufficiently clear for outsiders to help them to run a similar symposium in the future.Students of the other track serve as editorial board of a scientific journal featuring contributions from their fellow students, during one year (two issues). They are guided by an experienced tutor (Pierre de Graan) through the process of soliciting scientific contributions, finding independent external reviewers, carrying out editorial reviews and news and views themselves, assembling the referee reports and send them with a cover letter to the authors, judging the rebuttal and revised manuscripts, determine the lay-out of the manuscripts, send the print proofs to the authors for a final check, finalize the issue, find sponsors, pr via the website (http://journal.neuroscience-cognition.org), negotiate with the printer and distribute the journal among their fellow students. At the end, each student writes an evaluation that contains: a detailed description of the task of the student within the track, a SWOT analysis of the task and a time investment report, that is sufficiently clear for a new editorial board to edit the next issue.In addition to these practical parts of the course, the course also encompasses two round-table discussions (one with a representative from a professional conference organizer, the other with an editor from a scientific publisher), in which the students actively participate. GradingAt the start of the course students receive information about the issues (e.g. independence, dedication, effectiveness etc) on which their performance will be judged. They receive feedback on their performance from the tutor twice during the course, once halfway the process, and once at the end (also based on the written report).

Literature/study material used
Reader with information
Registration
During introduction meeting master N&C
Mandatory for students in Master’s programme
No.

Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
No
 
Prerequisite knowledge:
None

Essentials of Neuroscience

Period (from – till):
Essentials of Neuroscience Face-to-face course: 21 January 2019 - 1 Febuary 2019
Essentials of Clinical Neuroscience Online course: 7  January 2019 -  22 March 2019 
 Faculty
Ramakers, Adan, Burbach, Pasterkamp, De Graan, Kas; UMC Utrecht, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Department of Translational Neuroscience
Course descriptionOverall aim
The aim of the course is to provide sufficient background in molecular and cellular neuroscience to understand mechanisms underlying psychiatiric and neurological diseases.
 
Description of the Essentials of Neuroscience Face-to-face course:
This intense two weeks course is intended for non-neuroscience master students who want to get more background into neuroscience.  The lectures during the course cover a broad range of neuroscience topics from gene to neurological disease and include neuro-anatomy, neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, neurogenetics and diseases such as Epilepsy, Anorexia nervosa, Obesity and Parkinsons disease and are given by experts from the Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences. During the afternoons the students will work in couples on an assignment on a neurological disease. This assignment will results in a scientific presentation on the disease, which will discuss all aspects covered in the lectures, ranging from clinical symptoms and treatment, to molecular and cellular mechanisms, to genetic studies and genes involved. These presentations will be held on the last Friday during a symposium.

Description of the Essentials of Clinical Neuroscience Online course:
This online course gives you a unique opportunity to study the state of the art insights in Neurosciences, discover the research strengths of UMC Utrecht and experience our educational philosophy.With participants from all over the world you will follow weblectures by top UMC Utrecht neuroscientists, discuss recent developments in this field and make assignments and group projects online. This course gives you a unique opportunity to study the state of the art insights in Neurosciences, discover the research strengths of UMC Utrecht and experience our educational philosophy. Wherever you are, whenever you are available you can join our academic community of eager, young minds from behind your computer!
The course will consist of web lectures by renowned experts as well as articles, group assignments, individual assignments, peer feedback and feedback from teachers. During the course you will interact with other participants through assignments and discussions. The course will be moderated actively by professional moderators and teaching staff of the Brain Center Rudolf Magnus of UMC Utrecht.

Literature/study material used:
Parts of Neuroscience (Purves et al., Sinauer Ass.Inc., Sunderland, Massachusetts, 4e editie, 2004 (ISBN 978-0-87893-697-7)) and recent reviews and original articles.

Registration:
Essentials of Neuroscience Face-to-face course: apply at least 1 week before start of course.  Register via the study guide. The maximum number of participants is 40.
Essentials of Clinical Neuroscience Online course: apply at least 3 weeks before start of the course. Register via the study guide. The maximum number of participants is 16.

Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
BoD students: This course is one of the specific cardiovascular BoD-courses. Additional to the mandatory Kick off course, BoD students should accomplish 12 EC with specific (cardiovascular) BoD courses.
This is not applicable for the online variant of this course.

Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes, except for NSCN students.

Prerequisite knowledge:
No special requirements.

Ethology and Welfare

Period: 13 November 2017 - 8 December 2017
 Faculty

  1. dr. Saskia Arndt
  2. mw. Annemarie Baars
  3. dr. Frank Meijboom
  4. dr. Matthijs Schilder
  5. dr. Claudia Vinke
  6. prof dr L. Vanderschuren
  7. dr. Heidi Lesscher
  8. dr. Hetty Boleij
  9. dr. Vivian Goerlich-Jansson
  10. mw. Marsha Reijgwart MSc
  11. dr. Frank van Eerdenburg
  12. dr. Franz Josef van der Staay
  13. dr. Rebecca Nordquist
  14. dr. Yvonne van Zeeland

nrs. 1-10: Diergeneeskunde/ Dier in Wetenschap & Maatschappij
nrs. 11-13: Diergeneeskunde/ Gezondheidszorg Landbouwhuisdieren
nr.14: Diergeneeskunde/ Gezelschapsdieren
Course description
The course focuses at behavioural and welfare problems in animals.
It addresses the (neuro)ethological basis, the implications for science and society, and clinical aspects (causes, diagnostics, prevention, treatment).
A general outline is given below:
- Ontogeny and adaptation
- Behavioural pharmacology
- Pain assessment
- Neurobiology of adaptation
- Ethological observation and adaptation
- Chronic stress & welfare
- Animal welfare – as a scientific concept
-  Animal Welfare Management
- Animal welfare and Production Animals
- Ethics & Welfare
- Welfare of exotic animals & society 
- Introduction clinical ethology                                                         
- Clinical ethology of pet animals
- Clinical ethology of parrots
- Behaviour & Welfare of chicken
- Recent developments in farm animal husbandry systems
- Behaviour & Welfare of rats
- Animal communication and welfare
- Transgenerational effects and welfare
- Animal choice tests/consumer demand

Literature/study material used:
Peer reviewed scientific papers
 
Registration:
Apply via the study guide. The maximum number of participants is 25. Applications are on a "first come first serve" basis.
 
Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
No.
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Environmental Biology, especially the specialization programme Behavioural Ecology; and any other master programme with relevant basal courses.

Prerequisite knowledge:
Students from the master programme Neuroscience & Cognition of the Utrecht University are expected to have completed the general Fundamentals Course (15 ECTS). Other students are required to have a demonstrable BSc-level knowledge of neuroscience or behavioral biology.

Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Cognition

Period (from – till): 10 September 2018 - 16 November 2018
 Lecturer(s):
Over a period of 10 weeks are more than 40 teachers involved in this education. UMC, Veterinary Medicine, Pharmacy, Biology, Social Sciences.
 Course description
Neuroscience is a broad multidisciplinary research field. This course aims to provide starting N&C students, originating from various bachelor programs, with a firm background in the main topics in neuroscience, to introduce research groups involved in the master to facilitate internship selection and to give a first introduction into advanced neuroscience techniques. Topics include anatomy, structural and functional imaging, neuropharmacology, behaviour, cognition, memory, linguistics, biophysics, perception and action, neurophysiology, molecular neuroscience and neurogenetics.  Topics will cover normal brain function as well as a great variety of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. Students will get acquainted with the latest developments in the various fields, and with literature research and database mining, and will practise reviewing, reading, presenting and writing papers. Students will be introduced to state-of-the–art techniques by hands-on practicals and demonstrations. For practicals and assignments students with different backgrounds are mixed in multidisciplinary groups. Theoretical background will be provided in lectures, tutorials, computer-assisted practicals and self-study assignments.
Literature/study material used
The course uses the book “Principles of Neuroscience” (Kandel, Schwartx and Jessell), Mc Graw Hill).
Starting level is the book “Neuroscience” (Purves et al., Sinauer).
Registration:
Only students enrolled in the master Neuroscience and Cognition, they are enrolled automatically after acceptance to the programme.

Mandatory
Neuroscience and Cogntion, tracks Experimental & Clinical Neuroscience, Cognitive Neuroscience

Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
No.
 
Prerequisite knowledge:
Starting level is the book “Neuroscience”  (Purves et al., Sinauer).
Book ‘Molecular Biology of the Cell’, Alberts et al. 4th edition pages 3-12, 192-234, 302-373)
Book ‘Cognitive Neuroscience, Biology of the mind’, 2nd edition Gazzaniga et al, chapter 5-9)

Introduction to Matlab

Period (from - till): 18 February 2019 - 1 April 2019
Spread over 7 sessions on 18th Feb, 25th Feb, 4th March, 11th March, 18th March, 25th March and 1rd April 2019
Please note these dates are still subject to change.

Faculty
Mariana P. Branco, UMCU, BCRM, Department Neurosurgery and Neurology
Yuliya Berezutskaya,  UMCU, BCRM, Department Neurosurgery and Neurology

Course description
This course introduces computer programming in MATLAB to those with little to no previous MATLAB or programming experience. In this course the basics of programming syntax, loops and functions is given. Additionally, Matlab is introduced as a potential tool to solve basic neuroscience problems involving signal analysis, plotting and statistics. Lastly, this course also teaches how to do troubleshooting, debugging, and use specific external toolboxes. The student must have a laptop with an installation of MATLAB 2016a or later. MATLAB with a student’s license can be obtained from https://students.uu.nl/gratis-software

Literature/study material used:
Lecture slides and assignments will be given by the docents. No book required.

Registration:
Please register via the studyguide. Any questions can be asked to Mariana Branco (m.pedrosobranco@umcutrecht.nl).

Mandatory for students in Master’s programme:
No.

Registration open for students from other programme's:
Yes

Prerequisite knowledge
-

Neurocognition of Memory and Attention

Period (from – till): March 2019 - June 2019
 Faculty
Prof. Dr. J.L. Kenemans, Sociale Wetenschappen / Bètawetenschappen – Psychologische Functieleer,
Prof. Dr. A. Postma, Sociale Wetenschappen – Psychologische Functieleer,
Prof. Dr. J.J. Bolhuis, Sociale Wetenschappen / Bètawetenschappen – Psychologische Functieleer,
Prof. N. Ramsey, UMCU.
Course descriptionTopics in Memory and Attention research, especially those concerning the interface of attention and memory (e.g., working memory and the control of selective attention), as well as the interfaces between memory/ attention and other domains (perception, action, emotion). The main emphasis is on underlying neurobiological processes, as revealed in human and animal models.

Literature/study material used:
Books:

L. Kenemans & N. Ramsey (2013.  Psychology in the brain: Integrative cognitive neuroscience (293 pages). Palgrave Macmillan.

Articles: To be announced
 
Registration:
Apply via the study guide and at least 1 week before start of the course. The maximum of participants is 40.

Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
No.
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.
 
Prerequisite knowledge:
Relevant bachelor, basic neuroscience (as in “Cognitive Neuroscience” by Gazzaniga et al.)

Philosophy of Neuroscience

Period (from - till): June 2019

Course description
This course is offers compact, rigorous and practical journey in the philosophy of neuroscience, the interdisciplinary study of neuroscience, philosophy, cognition and mind. Philosophy of neuroscience explores the relevance of neuroscientific studies in the fields of cognition, emotion, consciousness and philosophy of mind, by applying the conceptual rigor and methods of philosophy of science. The teaching will start with the basics of philosophy of science including the work of Popper, Lakatos, Kuhn and Feyerabend, and use a methodological evaluation scheme developed from this work that allows rigorous evaluating neuroscientificresearch as science or pseudoscience. Furthermore, there will be attention for the historical routes of neuroscience starting with Aristotle, and the conceptual problems in neuroscience, methodological confusions in neuroscience, dualism and fysicalism. The main aim of the course is provide wide-ranging understanding of the significance, strengths and weaknesses of fields of neuroscience, which helps in critical thinking, creativity, methodological precision and scientific writing.

Literature/study material used
Book Chapters and Articles on Neurophilosophy and Philosophy of Neuro(science).
Registration
Via the study guide.

Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
No
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes

Rotations in Clinical and Experimental Neuroscience

Period (from – till): mid November 2016 - mid February 2017

Course descriptionThe students (6-8) participating in the special graduate program select 4 labs out of 16 during a special introduction day, where the PIs of the 16 labs and the students present themselves. The students rotate 4 times 2 weeks between the 4 labs of choice. During the 2 weeks in each lab they are buddied with a PhD student and experience the live in the lab and will do some small own experimental work. After each rotation period of two weeks the student has to write a one A4 report on the work and research done in the lab. Each Friday afternoon during the eight rotation weeks, the student will get round the table lectures by the 16 PIs (each week 2 PIs). These lectures will inform the students about the research done by the PIs and the techniques that are used in his/her field. After the rotation period the students have four days to prepare a presentation on one of the four rotations. They will present this to the students participating in the course, the 16 PIs and the course coordinators.
 Matory for students in Master’s programme:Exclusively for students in special graduate programme of the Master's Neuroscience and Cognition
Optional for students from other students of GSLS programmesNo.

Social and Affective Neuroscience

Period (from – till): January 2019 - March 2019
 Lecturer(s)
Dr. Estrella Montoya
Departement Psychologie
Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen
4 colleges, 100% van het voorbereiding en nakijk werk voor de examens

Dr. Peter Bos
Departement Psychologie
Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen
2 colleges

Dr. Jack van Honk
Departement Psychologie
Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen
2 colleges

Dr. David Terburg
Departement Psychologie
Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen
1 college
 Course description
This course offers comprehensive knowledge of the theoretical and experimental paradigms in the neuroscience of social and emotional behavior, based on the latest developments in these fields. The future of science as a “unity of knowledge” best reflects itself in Social and Affective Neuroscience. The primary aim is to teach students about the state-of-the-art in these multidisciplinary burgeoning fields, which combine neuroscience, psychology, biology, endocrinology, and economics, and to show how this multidisciplinary approach contributes to new knowledge concerning brain functions and social psychopathologies (e.g. social phobia, psychopathy, autism).
In this course we want to show you how the exciting field of social neuroscience looks like today, not only by giving an overview of the most important work in this field but also by letting you practice with the activities of a social neuroscientist. Therefore, this course offers both theoretical lectures and practical sessions. Each Social & Affective Neuroscience course day starts with a lecture and is followed by an activity or assignment in which you become a social neuroscientist yourself.

Literature/study material used
Recent Scientific Review Articles on the Neuroscience of Emotion and Emotional Disorders (updated each year).
Registration
Via the study guide.
 Mandatory for students in Master’s programme
* CN students are strongly recommended to follow one of these courses:
Social and Affective Neuroscience and/or Neurocognition of memory and attention

Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.

Prerequisite knowledge:
Relevant BA

General elective courses

Academic Writing

Period (from – till): This course will be given three times a year. See dates below for start and end dates of the course editions.  Specification of the 4 sessions per course as well when they come available.  FacultyCourse coordinator: Eva Herold, MSc, programme advisor BMS, UMC Utrecht, - If you have any questions regarding the content of the course, please contact the lecturer.Lecturer: Frans van Dam, Lecturer science communication, Faculty of Science

Course description
This mini-course will focus on the demands of ‘academic’ writing in English, and will include topics such as writing strategies, text plans, revision and structure. It is particularly helpful for students embarking on a research thesis or an internship report.

Registration
This course is (in first instance) open to all second year Master’s students of the Graduate School of Life Sciences. It is important that you are already experienced or starting with writing an internship report or Master's thesis. You can apply for this course starting from July 1st 2018 and registration is on a "first come, first served" basis. Applications before Julu 1st will not be taken into account.
For the editions of this course that start before 12 November 2018, you can apply via Study Guide.
For editions of this course that start after 12 November, you can apply via Osiris Student.
You will be able to register for this course in Osiris Student at specific intervals based, on the starting date of the course. The exact details will be communicated via email and the Study Guide at a later stage. Registration for these courses will open in the second half of September.​
The maximum number of participants is 15, the minimum 6.
Course dates
Group 1 Dates 13 Sept 2018 - 1 Nov 2018:Meeting 1: .
Meeting 2: 
Meeting 3: 
Meeting 4: 

Group 2 Dates 16 Jan 2019  - 27 Feb 2019:Meeting 1: 
Meeting 2:  
Meeting 3: 
Meeting 4: 

Group 3 Dates 13 Mar 2019 - 17 Apr 2019:
Meeting 1: 
Meeting 2:  
Meeting 3: Meeting 4: 

Literature/study material used
Will be handed out during the meetings.
Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
N.A.
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.
Testimonials
"This short course is very useful and instructive"
"The teacher is very enthusiastic"
"You work on your own report"
"Useful advise about the writing process and common pitfalls"
"Eye-opener"

Basics of Biostatistics

Period (from – till):  12 November 2018 - 7 December 2018

Programme: 
The more detailed programme of the course will follow when available.
 Faculty
Paul Westers, GNK (coordinator)
Cas Kruitwagen, GNK (weblecturer)
Rebecca Stellato, GNK (weblecturer)

Course description
Please note:Basic of Biostatistics is a 'Blended course'. The lectures of this course are offered online via Elevate and are self-studies. During the course there are some optional face-to-face meetings with the lecturers. These meetings are held at UMC Utrecht.

The four week course(4,5 ECTS, 32 hours per week)  provides an introduction to statistical methodology and supplies a number of statistical techniques important for practical data analysis. Examples from the medical and biological fields will be used in exercises. Datasets will be analyzed on the computer using the statistical package SPSS. The first part covers the "Basics of Biostatistics", statistical testing for one and two samples, confidence intervals, simple linear regression and correlation, one way analysis of variance, binomial distribution and proportions, analysis of contingency tables and non-parametric statistics. The second part covers an "Introduction to Modeling" and introduces the most important regression models used in biomedical research, that can be used in the study of the relation between a number of explanatory variables on the one hand, and the occurrence of an outcome on the other: multiple regression and logistic regression.
Note: Some basic statistical notions will be assumed known, such as measures of location (mean, median) and scale (variance, standard deviation), the normal distribution, standard error of the mean. They will not explicitly be repeated in the course, but will be used implicitly. If necessary, participants should refresh their knowledge using a statistics book used in previous courses, or using the statistics e-books.

Literature/study material used:
During the course all the course material will be online available. Besides this online material you can use also one of the following statistical books:

  • W.W. Daniel, Biostatistics: Basic Concepts and Methodology for the Health Sciences, International student version, 9th Edition. John Wiley & Sons, 2010;
  • P. Armitage, G. Berry and J.N.S. Matthews, Statistical Methods in Medical Research, 4th edition. Wiley-Blackwell, 2001;
  • M.C. Whitlock and D. Schluter. The Analysis of Biological Data. Roberts and Company Publishers, 2009;
  • J.H. Zar, Biostatistical Analysis, 5th Edition. Pearson Education International, 2010.

The first two books have more medical examples, whereas the last two books more biological examples. These reference books remain useful long after you have completed the course. They can be obtained from scientific bookstores. You are not obliged to use any of these books during the course.
Brief manuals of SPSS are included in the workbook of the course. If you are interested in more detailed manuals we recommend one of the following books:

  • A. de Vocht, Basishandboek SPSS 16, Bijleveld, 2008;
  • A. Field, Discovering Statistics Using SPSS, 3rd edition. SAGE Publications Ltd, 2009;
  • The very extended help function of SPSS itself.

An overview of all kinds of statistical hyperlinks (books, applets, software et cetera) on the internet is also given in the online course manual.

Examination
The examination consists of two parts, namely:

  1. a case study (25% of final grade)
  2. a final test (75% of final grade) consisting of open and multiple choice questions.

The grades for both parts should be at least 5the final test must be at least 5. To pass for the course the final grade should be at least 5.5. If the final grade is lower than 4 it is not allowed to do the re-exam, except if there is a permission from the exam committee.
Furthermore active (online) attendance is mandatory.

Registration
You can apply for this course through Osiris Student.
The course registrations of the course will be open at specific intervals based on the starting date.
The exact details will be communicated via email and the Study Guide at a later stage. Registration for these courses will open in the second half of September.
Students will be dived into four groups. The number of students per group is limited to 15 (60 students in total).
Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
N.A.
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.
Prerequisite knowledge
Although active statistical knowledge is not a prerequisite, we assume some basic knowledge on statistics and mathematics acquired through, for example, courses in biostatistics in the bachelor programme or self study.

The basic knowledge we assume are:
1) the concepts of population and sample;
2) histogram, boxplot, frequency table, scatterplot, contingency table;
3) mean, median, mode;
4) variance, standard deviation, range, interquartile range, standard error of the mean;
5) probability, probability distributions (especially the normal distribution).

If you want to refresh your basic knowledge we recommend one of the following sources of information (see also study material):

  • Chapters 1 till 5 of the book of W.W. Daniel;
  • Chapters 1 till 3 of the book of P. Armitage, G. Berry and J.N.S. Matthews;
  • Chapters 1 2, 3, 5 and 10 of the book of M.C. Whitlock and D. Schluter;
  • Chapters 1 till 6 of the book of J.H. Zar;
  • Module A and B of the Dutch E-learning software COSO (ComputerOndersteund StatistiekOnderwijs). It requires the (free) software authorware to run;
  • Module I, II, III, V of the very advanced online textbook Online Statbook;
  • Modules 1 and 2 (e-book) and/or module 1 (exercises) of CAST (Computer-Assisted Statistics Textbooks) that consists of a collection of electronic textbooks (e-books).

Several weeks before the start of the course there will be a test available for testing your basic knowledge on statistics and mathematics. It is then also possible to ask questions with respect to the basic knowledge to the lecturers. Both will be features of the Elevate environment of this course.

Bio-inspiration Essentials

The subjects being addressed
This is a course that introduces the field of Bio-Inspiration. We start to elucidate the philosophical and historical roots of the concept of bio-inspiration. We will touch upon movements like: deep ecology and permaculture and illustrious predecessors such as, Leonardo da Vinci, Buckminster fuller, Viktor Schauberger, Jay Harman and Bill Mollison.
Next, we will give an overview of the main bio-inspired approaches, being: biomimicry, bionics, nature inspired design, natural capitalism, biophilia, Circular Economy and CtoC. Moreover, you will learn to see similarities and differences, by to comparing and classifying different bio-inspired approaches.
Finally, we will address Design as a discipline and process. In this way you can start to formulate and explore possibilities for innovation as a product, process or systems innovation.
You learn how to define the function you want to ‘biologize’. By doing so, you will describe the scope and hoped-for-outcome in such a way that a biologist can deliver the information as an important co-creative step in an innovation process.
 
This is an online course stretching over 10 weeks with a study load of approximately 7 hours per week. The course consists of web lectures as well as articles, group assignments, individual assignments, peer feedback and feedback from teachers. During the course you interact with other participants through assignments and discussions. The course is moderated actively by a professional moderator and teaching staff.
 
The added value for the participants
For students with a chemical biological or bio-medical background it gives a first introduction into a whole new and promising field that combines economic values and methods (innovation) with nature based approaches.
For entrepreneurs, programme & project managers, policymakers, trade and industry professionals: the course will help you to understand the main concepts within bio-inspiration that allow you initiate and direct bio-inspired innovation-trajectories.

Summary of course content (max 75 words)
This course introduces a new field in Science and Design: Bio-Inspiration you will learn to look at nature as source of knowledge that will help to make our products, processes and systems part of nature, compatible with and supporting a transition to a circular economy instead of designing for the ‘dump’. After an overview of different Biologically Inspired approaches you will learn to define the scope and function of an innovation and write a first design-brief.

 

Cardiac Regenerative Medicine

Period (from - till): 28 January 2019 - 8 February 2019

Lecturer(s):
Lectures are provided by (guest) lecturers from the Hubrecht Institute, UMCU, and other national cardiac RM experts. Working groups are administered by guest lecturers from UMCU. Laymen and/or patients are involved in assignment(s).

Course description:
In this course the student will get acquainted with the application of regenerative medicine in cardiac diseases. Subjects like cardiac development, reprogramming, RM treatment options including non-cell based therapies and translational cardiac RM are addressed. In addition, students are introduced in the interpretation and processing of study data, and get acquainted with the impact of research on society, in particular on patients. The course consists of lectures, interactive meetings, an exam, and a group assignment, supervised by experts and laymen.

Literature/study material used:
- Primary literature
- E-module
- Textbook Medical Physiology (background information)

Registration:
Please register via the study guide Life Sciences.

Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
For BoD students: this course is one of the specific cardiovascular BoD-courses. Additional to the mandatory Kick off course, BoD students should accomplish 12 EC with specific (cardiovascular) BoD courses.

Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes. RMT and BoD students have priority for enrollment.

Prerequisite knowledge:
Bachelor in Life Sciences and basic knowledge about cell biology and cardiac physiology.

Co-create: life’s professional challenges

Period (from – till): Fall 2018. Exact course dates will be announced at a later date. Apply via E-mail to the Course Coordinator or via the study guide.
A second edition of this course will be organized in spring 2019. Dates and information about the registration procedure via Osiris will be made available at a later date.

Course Coordinator: Ing. Michèle Gerbrands (info@co-challenge.nl)

Facluty and Lecturer(s):
Heleen van Ravenswaaij Msc, Biomedical Sciences.
Heleen and Michele developed this elective course in co-operation with Career Services.
A diverse groups of lecturers and professionals from the educational and corporate world will share their knowledge and skills during this elective course

Course description:
As a bachelor year 3 / master student of the University Utrecht (UU) you are not far away from graduating, taking your first steps into the professional world. You will be challenged to work with a diverse group of colleagues, co-operate, and solve complex problems that fit users and society’s needs. This implicates that you need insights in how to grow as a professional in a fast changing world, be able to attain the right knowledge and skills.
Gaining new skills implicates the ability to actively plan, reflect, learn and experience your way into these skills to keep on track in a world where ‘life-long learning’ has become the standard.
 
This two-week elective course offers you a challenge to create a concept for a client in co-operation and co-creation with peers from several bachelor (year 3) and master programmes and professionals from the educational and corporate world. You are offered short inspirational sessions and workshops to discover which team- and individual based (soft)skills, techniques and tools are needed to deliver a concept. At a networking event you will pitch the concept and receive feedback. Several coaches are available if you need help (on-demand coaching). You will present your final concept to the client and a jury using a pitch and a report.
 
You will create an elevator pitch. Being able to pitch your own unique set of skills can assist you in your future employability. Therefore, a coach will guide you through the process of making this pitch, and you will hand in a video of the pitch
 If you want to find out more about the course and the previous topics and results of the challenges visit the website http://co-challenge.nl/.
 
This course is inspired on a co-creation event EduChallenge. A video of this challenge can be watched on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iyCVDV9ACw

Literature/study material used:
-
 
Registration:
You can apply for this course by sending an email to the course staff (info@co-challenge.nl).
Please include the following information:
Surname
Initials
First name
Master/beachelor programme:
Student number
Phone number
Mail address
Available full time (9:00- 16:30)  during the course: O yes/ O No
Short motivation (1 A4 page) why you want to participate, addressing the following topics:

  •  What is, according to you, entrepreneurship?
  •  What do you think you can learn from this course and what do you expect in general?
  • What do you think you can offer your peers in this course (in terms of knowledge, skills, personality etc.)?

 Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
No

Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes

Remarks
There is a limit of 25 students. Registration is on first come, first served basis (max. 6 students per bachelor/master) if the applicant will meet the following criteria:

  • You are available (full time) during the course (9:00-16:30).
  • Short motivational letter why you want to attend this elective course.

Every master student and bachelor year 3 from the UU can participate in this elective course. The theme of this real-world problem you will be solving is Healthy Urban living. You will be developing a concept for the City of Utrecht. A detailed description of the assignment will be presented online before the start of the course and face-to-face on day 1 of the course.
The course will be offered in English.

Schedule
A detailed schedule will be online before the start of the course and handed at the first meeting. We will start every day at 09:00 a.m. with an informal activity and end around 16:30 p.m. On day 4 the day ends at 18:30 p.m. due to the networking event.

Communicating Life Sciences

Period (from – till): 13 September 2018 – 15 November 2018. 
 Faculty
Course coordinator: Eva Herold, Msc, programme advisor BMS, UMC Utrecht, - If you have any questions regarding the content of the course, please contact the lecturer.
Lecturer: Connie Engelberts, MSc, science editor, UMC Utrecht
 Course description
During this course, the participants will write and edit articles for three editions of a digital newsmagazine from the Graduate School of Life Sciences. The course starts with three meetings in which the students learn to identify interests of their target group, practice interview techniques and exercise in popular science writing. In the second half of the course, the students will form an editorial board and write at least three popular science articles about Utrecht life sciences research. The course is available for 4-10 students.

Previous issues of Master for life magazine can be found here.

Programme13-9-2018donderdag11:0015:0020-9-2018donderdag13:1517:004-10-2018donderdag13:1517:0018-10-2018donderdag13:1517:001-11-2018donderdag13:1517:0022-11-2018donderdag13:1517:00
Literature/study material 
N.A.
 RegistrationYou can apply for this course for 2018-2019 starting from July 1st and registration is on a "first come, first served" basis. Applications before July 1st will not be taken into account.
You can register via the Study Guide.The maximum number of participants is 10, with a minimum of 4.

Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
N.A.
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.

English for Academic Purposes

Period (from – till): Seven times a year. The exact dates are displayed in the table below.
 Faculty
Teachers from Babel Talen, Utrecht

Course description
The Babel Language Institute organises an 'English for academic purposes' course specifically for Life Sciences students. You can take this course as part of your elective component, if your programme coordinator agrees.

This English for Academic Purposes course focuses on giving academic presentations and writing an academic paper. The students’ own subjects will be used as a basis for language work. We will consider some essential elements of a presentation: opening, closing, signposting the organisation, referring to visuals, handling questions, adopting the right body language, and involving the audien­ce. Students will learn how to give feedback and will improve their oral fluency and their vocabulary throughout the course.Furthermore, we will focus on language aspects relating to writing an academic paper. We will analyse its information and look at language conventions. Moreover, we will discuss some issues involving punctuation, formal and informal English, wordiness and the use of linking words. This course aims to develop and improve the writing and presenting skills students need in their master programme. In addition, students will activate and expand their vocabulary and improve their fluency in English.

The course length is 10 meetings of 2 hours. Students need to invest 3-5 hours of self-study per week. Students will pass the course if they attend at least nine meetings, have given a presentation, and have handed in a paper.
Literature/study material used
Textbook (writing and presenting scientific papers) and loose-leaf material will be handed out during the meetings.
RegistrationRegistration is on a "first come, first served" basis. You can register for the course through the Study Guide for courses in period 1 (groups 1 and 2 with starting date before November 12th 2018). Registration for the remaining courses in period 2-4 (groups 3-7 with starting dates after November 12th 2018) will be through OSIRIS.The maximum number of participants  per group is 10, the minimum 6.
Mandatory for students in Master’s programme
N.A.

Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.

Prerequisite knowledge
The English proficiency is of an upperintermediate to advanced level.

Teaching Schedule:
The course is taught from 19:15-21:15 in the Hijmans van den Bergh building. group 1group 2group 3group 4group 5group 6group 7 mondaytuesdaymondaytuesdaytuesdaywednesdaytuesday13-9-20184-9-201812-11-201813-11-20185-2-20196-2-201923-4-2019210-9-201811-9-201819-11-201820-11-201812-2-201913-2-201930-4-2019317-9-201818-9-201826-11-201827-11-201819-2-201920-2-20197-5-2019424-9-201825-9-20183-12-20184-12-201826-2-201927-2-201914-5-201951-10-20182-10-201810-12-201811-12-20185-3-20196-3-201921-5-201968-10-20189-10-201817-12-201818-12-201812-3-201913-3-201928-5-2019715-10-201816-10-20187-1-20198-1-201919-3-201920-3-20194-6-2019822-10-201823-10-201814-1-201915-1-201926-3-201927-3-201911-6-2019929-10-201830-10-201821-1-201922-1-20192-4-20193-4-201918-6-2019105-11-20186-11-201828-1-201929-1-20199-4-201910-4-201925-6-2019reserve12-11-201813-11-20184-2-20195-2-201916-4-201917-4-20192-7-2019reserve19-11-201820-11-201811-2-201912-2-201923-4-201924-4-20199-7-2019

Fundamentals of Biofabrication, online course

Note: this is an online course stretching over 9 weeks with a study load of approximately 10 hours per week.

Period: exact dates will follow

Course coordinator: Dr. Jacqueline Alblas
Lecturer: Iris Otto, MSc

Course content
Biofabrication combines advanced 3D fabrication techniques with biological systems to create designed tissue constructs, which can be applied for tissue engineering, as 3D in vitro biological models or as medical therapeutic products. This e­course aims to provide the student with the fundamental knowledge on the various aspects of biofabrication, including 3D printing techniques, biomaterials, tissue engineering, applications, translation and ethics. 
 
The subjects being addressed: 

  • 3D printing history, techniques, applications
  • CAD/CAM, 3D modelling, STL, G code
  • Medical imaging to printing
  • 3D printing techniques: additive manufacturing, robotic
    dispensing, fused deposition modelling, electrospinning,
    stereolithography, powder printing, metal printing
  • 3D printing in the clinic: devices and implants
  • Biomaterials: polymers, bioinks, tissue­derived matrices
  • Cells and stem cells
  • Cell printing
  • Applications: cartilage, liver, cardiovascular system,
    organ­on­a­chip, in vitro models
  • Translation, bench­to­bedside
  • Automation, implementation, regulation
  • Ethics

 
The added value for the participants:
This course provides fundamental knowledge on biofabrication and is developed by a leading research group within the biofabrication field. Weblectures are given by experts in the fields of tissue engineering, materials sicence, mechanical engineering, medicine, biology and ethics.

Registration
The registration will be via the Study guide.

History of Medicine and the Biomedical Sciences

Period (from – till): February 2018 -  April 2018
 Faculty:
Prof. dr. F.G. Huisman, Julius Centre UMC Utrecht
Course description:
This is a nine-week course that is part of the Research Master History and Philosophy of Science, offered by the Descartes Centre for the History and Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities. In principle, it is open to all MA students of the Graduate School of the Life Sciences.
Modern biomedical science and modern medicine originated - both epistemologically and institutionally – in the period between 1850 and 1950. The epoch not only witnessed the birth of the modern hospital and the laboratory, but there was a growing awareness that the state had an important role to play in public health as well. Taken together, the hospital, the laboratory and the caring state can be considered as the symbols of modernity.
 
Over the course of time, the medical scientist and the clinician have become valuable citizens, who transformed our health care system profoundly. At the same time, scientific progress has come with problems and drawbacks. In order to understand modern medicine and health care, it makes sense to take a look at its historical roots.
This course is an introduction to the birth of modern medicine, looking at developments over the course of the ‘long nineteenth century’. After an introduction of five weeks, you are expected to choose a topic that particularly interests you and write a paper about it. Topics may be chosen from any period between Classical Antiquity and contemporary biomedicine.
You will find out that history is not about presenting dry facts about the past, but rather about reflecting the human condition. Medical history is thinking about the ways in which man is dealing with health and illness, with pain and death – both in the past and in the present.

Literature/study material used:
- W.F. Bynum, Science and the practice of medicine in the nineteenth century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994).
- M. Jackson ed., The Oxford handbook of the history of medicine (Oxford: Oxford university press, 2011):
* R. Cooter, ‘Medicine and modernity’ (pp. 100-116)
* H.J. Cook, ‘Medicine in western Europe’ (pp. 190-207)
* M. Gorsky, ‘The political economy of health care’ (pp. 429-449)
* R. Bivins, ‘Histories of heterodoxy’ (pp. 578-597)
 - Chr. Hamlin, Cholera: the biography (Oxford UP, 2009).

Registration:
Please register via the study guide.
 
Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
N.A.
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
This course is an elective course for all Master’s student of the Graduate School of Life Sciences. It is open to all students enrolled in the Research Master History and Philosophy of Science.

Prerequisite knowledge:
Bachelor’s degree and admission granted to a GSLS Master’s programme or Research Master History and Philosophy of Science.

International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition

Period (from – till): February - November

Course coordinator: Prof. Niels Geijsen (n.geijsen@hubrecht.eu)

Faculty:
Prof. Niels Geijsen (n.geijsen@hubrecht.eu)
Dr. Margot Koster (M.C.Koster@uu.nl)
Prof. Dr. Guido van den Ackerveken
Prof. Dr. Roos Masereeuw
Dr. Ton Peeters
 Course description:The iGEM (international Genetically Engineered Machine competition), http://igem.org/Main_Page, is an international organization that stimulates students to work together to solve real-world challenges by building genetically engineered biological systems with standard, interchangeable parts. The competition already involves more than 100 teams from many universities and institutes. This course offers students the unique possibility to work in an interdisciplinary team on a very challenging project. The students do not only have to design and build a genetically engineered biological system, but also need to get sponsors, attract media attention and finally present their work on different occasions, including the iGEM jamboree in November in Boston.

Assessment is based on participation, the quality of the final report and an individual report to be judged by at least two instructors/teachers. 
 Literature/study material: 
N.A.

Registration
For application and or information you can contact Prof. Niels Geijsen or Dr. Margot Koster. Deadline for  the application is February 1. The team is selected from motivated students in a face-to-face interview. (July-august min. 75 % availability is required). For application and or information you can contact Prof. Niels Geijsen (n.geijsen@hubrecht.eu ) or Dr. Margot Koster (M.C.Koster@uu.nl).

Mandatory for GSLS students.
No.
Optional for students from other GSL Master's programmes:Yes.

Prerequisite knowledge:
N.A.

Laboratory Animal Sciences

Period (from – till): several times a year.
 Faculty
Teachers from the Department of Animals in Science and Society , Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiteit Utrecht

NOTE: There are different courses offered please read the information on the websites carefully. You should take the laboratory animal sciences course only if you need it for your research project; you must have permission from your supervisor and your programme coordinator.

You can find the exact course dates and information for the English taught course here.
More information about the Dutch taught course can be foud here.
Course description
This course is a requirement for conducting animal experiments and teaches you the basics on animal research.
The objective of the course is to present basic facts and principles that are essential for the humane use and care of animals and for the quality of research. From the beginning of the course, emphasis is placed on the fact that the scientist is the central person in the design and performance of animal experiments, and that he/she has specific responsibilities with respect to the welfare of the animals used. It is made clear that the use of animals can be accepted only under a set of strict conditions. Among these are that the experiment must be approved by an ethics committee, and must be conducted by persons who are fully competent.Please note:

  • You should take the laboratory animal sciences course only if you need it for your research project; you must have permission from your supervisor and your programme coordinator.
  • Because this course is expensive, you need to fill the rest of your elective component with modules which are free of extra costs, in exceptional cases more than one course may be allowed. You have to ask prior approval from the Board of Examiners if you want to take more than one of these courses.

Registration:

  • For BMS students BIFM, BIDM, CSND, EPIM, IMIF, NSCN, RMTM, TXEH: please use the registration form which can be found in the here.
  • For students from ENVB, MCLS, SBM and DINN: please use the standard form of the LAS course which you can find here.

Fill out the form and first hand it in at your Master's programme’s administration desk for approval. You need a signature and financial account number in order to have the form accepted at the LAS administration. In order to get approval from the Board of Examiners please add a signed statement of your examiner that this course is mandatory for your researchproject. After obtaining the approval you can sent the form to the LAS administration.
Mandatory for students in GSLS Master’s programme
No.

Optional for students in GSLS Master’s programme
Yes.
 More information in Dutch: click here, in English: click here.

Career orientation & professionalisation

This course is in Dutch only!De mastercursus Loopbaanoriëntatie en Professionalisering is een cursus voor masterstudenten van de Utrecht University, Graduate School of Life Sciences. De cursus wordt sinds 2001 gegeven door Jan van den Broek, managementtrainer en o.a. werkzaam bij de Bètafaculteit van de Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen.  
Cursusomschrijving
De student analyseert zichzelf en de arbeidsmarkt en stelt een plan van aanpak op om zijn/haar doel te bereiken. Daarnaast wordt een aantal managementvaardigheden getraind. De cursus beoogt zelfreflectie en externe oriëntatie actief te stimuleren, o.a. door presentaties van individuele competentieprofielen, beroepsprofielen, netwerkervaringen, zoekrichtingen en actieplannen. Verder biedt de cursus de mogelijkheid om kennis, inzicht en vaardigheden met betrekking tot een aantal algemene professionele functievereisten (verder) te ontwikkelen: o.a. multidisciplinair samenwerken, projectmanagement, probleem solving, persoonlijke effectiviteit en leren omgaan met belangentegenstellingen (onderhandelingstechnieken en conflicthantering). De cursus wordt gegeven in het Nederlands. De cursusdagen zijn 7 hele dagen (9.00-17.00).
De cursus kent geen tentamen maar wordt afgerond met een persoonlijk werkstuk. Studenten ontvangen een beoordeling in de vorm van een cijfer.  Registration:
Stuur een e-mail aan science.gsls@uu.nl onder vermelding van naam, studentnummer, e-mail adres, telefoonnummer, masterprogramma. Let op, het aantal maximaal toe te laten studenten is 20. De aanmelding wordt geaccepteerd indien er plek is en na bevestiging.

Mandatory for students in Master’s programme: NO.
Optional for students in other Master’s programmes GS-LS: Optional for all GSLS students who have a good command of the Dutch language.
                                                         
 Wat reacties van studenten na afloop van de cursus vorig jaar:
“In deze cursus heb ik geleerd hoe ik mijzelf moet presenteren, hoe ik professioneel overkom. Zelfreflectie vond ik een belangrijk onderdeel. Door deze cursus is mijn koers duidelijker geworden.”
“Ik liep te twijfelen over wat ik kon doen na mijn studie. Deze cursus heeft inzicht gegevens in wat ik wil, wat ik kan en wat ik waard ben op de arbeidsmarkt. Dankzij deze cursus heb ik het aangedurfd op meerdere posities te solliciteren en heb ik een geweldige baan in het bedrijfsleven gevonden”.    

Nanomed

Characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, surface area and internal composition make them attractive candidates for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The aim of this course is to provide an overview of the nanomedicine field. Every week a theme will be discussed in which nanomedicine is involved: therapeutics (both synthetic and bio-inspired) and diagnostics. We will focus on the applications of nanomedicine in cardiovascular disease and cancer.
 
After an introductory lecture on a specific theme, you will have an interactive meet up with two experts of the cardiovascular and cancer field, respectively. During the week you will work on an assignment together with one of the other students. During the course you will write a research proposal, present a paper and present the unique selling point of a nanomedicine company.  

Philosophy of Neuroscience

Period (from - till): June 2019

Course description
This course is offers compact, rigorous and practical journey in the philosophy of neuroscience, the interdisciplinary study of neuroscience, philosophy, cognition and mind. Philosophy of neuroscience explores the relevance of neuroscientific studies in the fields of cognition, emotion, consciousness and philosophy of mind, by applying the conceptual rigor and methods of philosophy of science. The teaching will start with the basics of philosophy of science including the work of Popper, Lakatos, Kuhn and Feyerabend, and use a methodological evaluation scheme developed from this work that allows rigorous evaluating neuroscientificresearch as science or pseudoscience. Furthermore, there will be attention for the historical routes of neuroscience starting with Aristotle, and the conceptual problems in neuroscience, methodological confusions in neuroscience, dualism and fysicalism. The main aim of the course is provide wide-ranging understanding of the significance, strengths and weaknesses of fields of neuroscience, which helps in critical thinking, creativity, methodological precision and scientific writing.

Literature/study material used
Book Chapters and Articles on Neurophilosophy and Philosophy of Neuro(science).
Registration
Via the study guide.

Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
No
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes

Radiation Safety 5B

Period (from – till):  Several times a year. The exact dates will be published on the website of TU Delft.
 Faculty
W.F. Wiersma, PhD, head of the training centre/tutor in Utrecht, NCSV
Course description
This course can be followed in English and in Dutch. Go to  the website for detailed information.

The radiation safety course 5B level is open to MSc students who need it for their research project. You must have permission from your supervisor and your programme coordinator.
Please note: Because this course is expensive, you need to fill the rest of your elective component with modules which are free of extra costs. The costs of the radiation safety course at level 4B will not be reimbursed.
The course Health Physics expert level 5B is meant for radiation experts in situations where radioactive sources with a low risk of exposure are used. The course offers a useful introduction in working with ionizing radiation for all kinds of radiation workers, such as laboratory personnel, technical staff, medical personnel and workers in industry. Because of the diversity in work environment of the participants, the course will not focus on one specific radioisotope.
A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is used for this course. Participants will have to study before the start of the training. This can be done independently and all students are fee to choose their own study moments.
The course level 5B is open to MSc students who will have to work with radioactive material during their research project. You must have permission from your supervisor and your program coordinator.
The exam consists of 50 multiple choice questions. After passing this exam, you will receive the certificate Health Physics expert level 5B and are allowed to work independently with radioisotopes.

The courses will be taught at the Ornstein Laboratory, Princetonplein 1, De Uithof, Utrecht.
More information, contact details and registration form can be found here.
 Literature/study material
Practical Radiation Protection (J. van den Eijnde, M. Schouwenburg)
(in the course fee included)

Registration
To register:
1. Fill in the General application form for electives;

After approval fill in the from below of the TU Delft
2. Form of the TU Delft

Mandatory for GSLS students.
No.
Optional for students from other GSL Master's programmes:Yes.

Prerequisite knowledge:
The course is based on participants with a technical, medical or scientific education on university level. A good knowledge of physics, chemistry and mathematics is necessary.

Science and Society

Period (from – till): 18 January 2019 -  1 July 2019
Note: The exact course dates and schedule of lectures are available in the detailed desciption through the link below.
Faculty
Prof. dr. F.G. Huisman, Julius Centre UMC Utrecht;
Dr Annemieke Meijer
Guest lecturers
 Course description
A  detailed description of the course can be found here on the Study Guide.

In modern life, science is everywhere. The products of biomedical science and technology may help achieve a healthy society and economic progress. They may even prolong life and make it more agreeable at the same time. But how much do we really know about the production, implementation and evaluation of scientific knowledge? What, exactly, is the basis for our belief in science? What sets it apart from common knowledge? Who should we trust in case two scientists disagree in a hotly debated issue? Is science a vocation or just another profession? Is scientific knowledge something special to be emulated, or ‘just another opinion’? Are scientific facts discovered or socially constructed? How are science and technology embedded in society and how do they change over time?
 
Whoever wants to become a scientist, should be aware of these and similar questions; (s)he should not just know about the contents of scientific knowledge, but about its context as well. This course sets out to create that awareness. Until recently, it was only available to PhD students. Now, an abridged version is offered to graduate students. In six Friday afternoon sessions, the historical, philosophical, sociological and ethical dimensions of the biomedical sciences will be discussed.

For those of you who are interested in a public debate that is now going on with regard to science and the university, see www.scienceintransition.nl and http://www.wetenschapsagenda.nl/.

The course will be assessed by means of a writing assignment: you will be asked to submit a 1500 word paper on any topic, related to the theme of the course.
 
You will write an argumentative essay: one in which you discuss a controversial issue, take up a position and give supporting arguments aimed to persuade your readers to accept your claim(s). It is different from the types of text that you may be used to writing (lab reports, research papers) in that the writer has a clear voice – he or she is present in the text, which allows for (or indeed, requires) a considerable amount of creativity and personal choice. You may use a variety of sources, both scholarly and popular (newspapers, magazine articles).
 
Your essay will be graded on the basis of the following criteria:

  • information: detailed, accurate, relevant
  • structure: rigorously argued, logical, easy to follow
  • interpretation: evidence of independent thought and critical analysis
  • use of evidence: key points supported with evidence, critically evaluated
  • academic referencing: good use of academic referencing conventions
  • style & use of language

 
Literature/study material used:
Three articles, taken from the Golem-series by Harry Collins and Trevor Pinch:
 
- ‘Introduction: the Golem’ and ‘The Germs of Dissent: Louis Pasteur and the Origins of Life’ in: Collins and Pinch, The Golem. What You Should Know about Science (Cambridge UP 1993), 1-3 and 79-90.
- ‘ACTing UP: AIDS Cures and Lay Expertise’ in: Collins and Pinch, The Golem at Large. What You Should Know about Technology (Cambridge UP 1998), 126-150.
- ‘Vaccination and Parents’Rights. Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR), and Pertusis’ and ‘The Themes Revisited’ in: Collins and Pinch, Dr. Golem. How to Think about Medicine (The University of Chicago Press 2005), 180-204 and 205-224.
 
In addition to these articles, speakers will provide one or two articles on the topic of their lecture. When possible, we will send an email with these attachments before the meetings, so that you can prepare the topics to be discussed. Students should print the documents themselves.

Registration:
Please register via Osiris Student (more information here) and by sending an email to Ms M. van Dijk-Okla: m.vandijk-okla@umcutrecht.nl, including the following information:

  • Name
  • Email address
  • Home Address
  • Zip code and City
  • A short motivation

The maximum number of students is 25.
All Master’s students of the Graduate School of Life Sciences are welcome to attend the course. There is, however, a maximum capacity of 25 participants. Should there be more applicants, the final 25 will be selected on the basis of their application letter.
You are expected to be an active participant, i.e. to prepare the topic and to take part in the general discussion.
 

Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
N.A.
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.
 
Prerequisite knowledge:
Bachelor’s degree and admission granted to a GSLS Master’s programme

Societal challenges for life science scientists: exploring interdisciplinarity

Period (from - till): 3-14 December 2018

Course coordinators:
Dr. ir. M.E.G.L. Lumens
Dr. G.M.J. Ramakers

Course description:
One overarching interdisciplinary theme will be chosen each year. This year the theme is Food and health. In the first few days, lecture/discussion will be organized with experts in the field to help students familiarize with the topic, get an overview of the current debate, and the problems to solve. In the meantime, students will be instructed on the principles of interdisciplinary research.
Students form interdisciplinary groups of 3/4 and develop a research question within the theme that captured their interest. After presenting their plans and receiving (peer) feedback on the feasibility of their plans, students make a concrete plan for the rest of the course period and divide tasks.  Each team has a supervisor.

Examination:AssessmentDescriptionWeightONDERZResearch proposal40%OPDRACHTAssignment30%PRESENTPresentation30%
Literature/study material used:
-
RegistrationYou can apply for this course through Osiris Student.
The course registrations of the course will be open at specific intervals based on the starting date.
The exact details will be communicated via email and the Study Guide at a later stage. Registration for these courses will open in the second half of September.
Mandatory for students in own Master’s programme:
N.A.
 
Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.
Prerequisite knowledgeStudents should be enrolled in a master's programme of the Graduate School of Life Sciences.

Vascularized Tissue Engineering online course

Period (from – till): 23 April 2018 - 8 June 2018
Note: this is an online course stretching over 7 weeks with a study load of approximately 8 hours per week (taking into account vacation days). Please take into account that the study load is divided over the week so you will need to be able to login on various moments.
The e-moderator will keep track of your progression. He/she will score the quality of the content and your responses on all required activities. This results in ‘insufficient, ‘sufficient’ or ‘good’. You need at least a 5.5 for all three individual components to pass the course.  ​

Course coordinator: Dr. Caroline Cheng/Dr. Joost Fledderus
Lecturer: Merle Maas-Krebber, MSc

Course description:
Tissue engineering (TE) is an ever-growing multidisciplinary scientific field aiming at replacing injured, missing or damaged tissue. Current researchers in the field use different principles, knowledge and techniques from (stem) cell biology, vascular biology, medicine, biomaterials and bioengineering. Vascular and vascularized tissue engineering take prominent places within this field.  The construction of blood vessels is both an independent target for replacement therapy as well as an integral part of larger constructs. A crucial challenge in obtaining large sized functional TE scaffolds (>1 milimeter in any dimensional space) is how to introduce a complex vascular tree that supplies a steady medium and blood stream for the expanding tissue to meet oxygen en nutrient demands.
This course teaches Master students’ in-depth and hands-on knowledge on developmental and adult blood vessel formation in health and disease and the current clinical treatments for which vascular(ized) TE is thought to be eligible. Moreover, we will address state of the art techniques of vascular(ized) TE, including the use of biomaterials and cell sources for bioreactor-cultured and in situ applications.

This course teaches fundamental knowledge on vascular and vascularized tissue engineering, adding significantly to the currently available curriculum concerning angiogenesis, vascular repair and remodeling, regenerative medicine and cardiovascular disease. Participants in this e-course will benefit from the flexible work hours, enabling participation parallel to writing a thesis or doing an internship abroad. This course was developed using collaborative partners leading in regenerative medicine and cardiovascular disease. Grading of this course will be based on handing in a graphical abstract (group assignment), an individual assignment and on individual participation during the course and in discussion forums.

Required Materials: 
N.A.

Mandatory for students in Master’s programme:
N.A.

Optional for students in other GSLS Master’s programme:
Yes.

Registration:
Please register via the Study guide. Deadline for registration is April 6.

Prerequisite knowledge:
Open to Master students of all GSLS programmes. In case of exceeding the maximum amount of participants (16), students from RMT, BOD, Biofab will get priority placement.

9 week online course ‘Essentials of clinical neuroscience’ 

The Brain Center Rudolf Magnus invites you to participate in the online course ‘Essentials of clinical neuroscience’. This course for advanced Bachelor’s / beginning Master’s students with an interest in this topic can be followed completely online. In nine weeks you will study the essentials of neurosciences, discover the research strengths of UMC Utrecht and experience our educational philosophy. Upon completion of the course you will obtain a certificate of completion with a study load indication of 3 EC.