Profile

 

Lauren Gould is Assistant Professor in Conflict Studies.

 

PhD research

The Global Justice Assemblage: International Criminal Law Enforcement and the Governing of the Northern Ugandan Conflict. 

Informed by a critical discursive approach her PhD research analyzes how an assemblage of actors within the “conflict industry” upholds a “new war” frame of the violent conflict between the Lords Resistance Army and the Government of Uganda. Secondly, it examines how this new war frame has legitimized a number of judicial and military interventions, purportedly to “protect the rights of others.” Thirdly, it reflects on how these interventions are playing out in practice in the day-to-day lives of those targeted. Finally, it analyzes who has an interest in upholding these particular narratives and institutional responses.

Lauren has been conducting qualitative field research in Uganda since 2007. 

Her research has culminated in a number of publications that focus on some of the different types of institutions and interventions that have been implemented to address the violence perpetrated, such as the International Criminal Court, the International Crimes Division of the Ugandan High Court and the current counter LRA military mission lead by the African Union and supported by AFRICOM. 

Key words: violent conflict, critical discursive approach, power, framing, discourse, transitional justice, international criminal law, humanitarian intervention, reconciliation. 

 

Lecturer: As a lecturer at the Centre for Conflict Studies, Lauren Gould is currently the head lecturer of the course Introduction to Conflict Analysis and Framing Violence and the course coordinator of Identity, Boundaries and Violence. She also is currently supervising 8 MA Conflict Studies and Human Rights students.

 

Involved in the following study programme(s)
Scientific expertise
reconciliation
International Criminal Justice
humanitarian intervention
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Key publications

Gould, L.M. (2015). The Politics of Portrayal in Violent Conflict - The Case of the Kony 2012 Campaign . Alternatives, 39 (4), (pp. 207-230 ).

Gould, L.M., Brants, C.H. & Brants, K. (2013). Selling the ICC: Imagery and Image Building in Uganda. In C Brants, A Hol & D Siegel (Eds.), Transitional Justice Images and Memories (pp. 143-160) (18 p.). Londen: Ashgate.

All publications
  2016 - Scholarly publications
  2016 - Other output
Demmers, J. & Gould, L.M. (08.09.2016). An Assemblage Approach to Contemporary Shadow Warfare - AFRICOM and the “hunt” for Joseph Kony.
L.M. Gould (09.09.2016) Izmir Relocated - Histories of Interventionism: A Cross Disciplinary Approach.
  2015 - Scholarly publications
Gould, L.M. (2015). The Politics of Portrayal in Violent Conflict - The Case of the Kony 2012 Campaign . Alternatives, 39 (4), (pp. 207-230 ).
  2014 - Popularising publications
Gould, L.M. (30.09.2014). Haagse Strafhof is in Noord-Oeganda zeer omstreden. De Volkskrant [online]
  2014 - Other output
Gould, L.M. (08.05.2014). Ab)using International Criminal Law to frame perpetrators and victims - The Politics of Portrayal in Uganda.
L.M. Gould (08.05.2014) Conference Engagement, Legitimacy, Contestation: Transitional Justice and Its Public Spheres
  2013 - Scholarly publications
Gould, L.M., Brants, C.H. & Brants, K. (2013). Selling the ICC: Imagery and Image Building in Uganda. In C Brants, A Hol & D Siegel (Eds.), Transitional Justice Images and Memories (pp. 143-160) (18 p.). Londen: Ashgate.
  2012 - Scholarly publications
Gould, L.M. (2012). The Interface Between Transitional Justice and Reconciliation in the Wake of Civil War - A Case Study of Northern Uganda . In I Boerefijn, L Henderson , R Janse & R Waever (Eds.), Human Rights and Conflict - Essays in Honour of Bas de Gaay Fortman (pp. 499-524). Cambridge : Intersentia.
  2012 - Popularising publications
Gould, L.M. (15.03.2012). Campagne Kony 2012 vertelt het halve verhaal. Trouw, opinie artikel
  2012 - Other output
Gould, L.M. (19.10.2012). Politics of Portrayal in northern Uganda: The Kony 2012 Campaign.
  2011 - Scholarly publications
Ryngaert, C.M.J. & Gould, L.M. (2011). International Criminal Justice and Jus Post Bellum - The Challenge of ICC Complementarity: A Case-Study of the Situation in Uganda. Belgian Review of International Law, 44 (1-2), (pp. 91-121) (31 p.).
  2010 - Other output
L.M. Gould (09.05.2010) The path to social, economic and political recovery in the wake of northern Uganda’s civil war.
  2009 - Other output
L.M. Gould (27.02.2009) Explaining Reconciliation: Performances, Mechanisms, and Processes towards Reconciliation.
L.M. Gould (16.12.2009) Reconciliation in the Wake of Civil War; A Case Study of Northern Uganda
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Completed projects

Project:
Uganda War Documentation Archive 01.03.2011 to 01.01.2014
General project description

 


While Uganda is one of the most researched “post” conflict areas in Africa, most of the raw data collected and reports written have not been brought ‘back’ to the people and is not easily accessible for students, scholars and practitioners that are interested in learning more about the impact of war and interventions on people’s day-to-day lives. This lets a lot of valuable data go to waste. With our eyes set on memory and remembrance; post conflict reparation and transitional justice; creating a dialogue where past human rights abuses can be discussed; and creating a forum for interdisciplinary learning, the Centre for Conflict Studies (CCS) in partnership with the leading Ugandan research institute, Refugee Law Project are in the process of creating a (online) War Documentation Archive within a larger framework of a War Memorial Centre. Both institutes have independently worked on the idea of a War Documentation Archive since early 2009, but in October 2010 the CCS and the RLP decided to combine their expertise and make the creation of a War Documentation Archive a joint effort. 


 


 

 

 
Role Researcher Funding
Utrecht University: FOCUS AND MASSA
Project members UU
External project members:
  • Moses Chrispus Okello
  • Refugee Law Project
Project:
Impact of international criminal courts 01.11.2010 to 01.01.2014
General project description

International criminal justice tribunals were established to investigate and prosecute gross violations of international human rights and international humanitarian law, in particular genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. These tribunals not only aim to judge individual crimes, but they also strive for reconciliation, including retribution and redress for victims, as a prerequisite for future peace and stability. 
These are high expectations and objectives. However, the chance of success is largely dependent on and influenced by – amongst other factors – domestic expectations and participation, the visibility and transparency of international criminal justice proceedings and their outcomes, and the acceptance of the proceedings and results as legitimate and just. Various aspects of these issues are the central theme of this symposium and edited volume: an insider perspective from of the Office of the Public Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court, Office, the lessons to be learned from the experiences with transitional challenges in (post-) conflict societies and the role of the media in international criminal law will be discussed in relation to fundamental questions of the legitimacy of transitional justice, one of which concerns its transparency

 
Role PhD Candidate & Researcher
Individual project description

For this project I conducted 2 months of field research in Uganda and wrote the following forthcoming chapter that is set to be published in the edited volume in 2013;


Brants, C., Brants, K and Gould, L. Communicating the ICC: Imagery and Image-Building in Uganda

Funding
Utrecht University: Focus and Massa: Conflict Studies and Human Rights
Project members UU
Project:
Finding remedies for grave historical injustices 01.11.2011 to 01.01.2014
General project description

Since the 1990s a rising number of academic accounts on remedies for serious and grave injustices have been published. Each year numerous new books and articles on tribunals, financial compensation, apologies and truth commissions find their way to academics from a broad range of disciplines that each from their own perspective deal with the question how to repair grave injustices from the past as effectively as possible. A serious problem however continues to be that broad interdisciplinary accounts that not only focus on either retributive measures (punishing the perpetrator) or restorative measures (restoring the victim) so far are not available or are completely outdated. 
The objective of this project is to develop a new extensive text book that critically assesses all available remedies for serious and grave injustices, ranging from criminal tribunals to financial compensation and commemorations. 
Differently than many other accounts in this field this book can be regarded as truly interdisciplinary in the sense that it puts the increasing use of instruments of transitional justice and their functioning in their proper legal, socio-political and historical contexts. Furthermore, the book not only wants to describe, but also wants to raise questions by alternating short historical overviews with in-depth articles on topical issues. The first part of the book examines specific difficulties and challenges that all available remedies are confronted with. (When do historical injustices become genocide? What to do with bystanders and victims that also have become perpetrators?) The second and third part of the book pay attention to both positive as well as well as negative aspects and characteristics of available instruments. (Politicization of tribunals; Balancing the rights of perpetrator and victim; Inevitability of apologies; Educational powers of statues and monuments from the ‘dark past’.) 
The book ends with four still pending cases and issues ranging from the effectiveness of the ICC to the continuing debate on the legacy of colonialism/slavery, the Armenian ‘genocide’ and the drama of Srebrenica. These case studies can be used as stepping stones for further discussion on the functioning of specific instruments and the opportunities to deal with delicate issues that either have reference to a distant or more recent past. 
Because of its all-encompassing and interdisciplinary character, its clear structure and its question raising approach this text book may be regarded as a perfect introduction to the topic of transitional justice for students from different academic domains. 

 
Role PhD Candidate & Researcher
Individual project description

For this project I conducted two months of field research in northern Uganda and wrote the following chapter in the forthcoming edited volume;


Gould, L. The contestation of international criminal law; The politics of framing abducted child soldiers who are captured as adult commanders.

Funding
Utrecht University: Focus and Massa: Conflict Studies and Human Rights
Project members UU
Project:
Transitional Justice Instruments on the Road to Reconciliation 01.11.2010 to 01.11.2011
General project description

Since the end of world war two, wars have increasingly been waged within states instead of between states. Such internal wars have characteristically been fought with the active and widespread involvement of the civilian population. Herein, identity and identity groups have become crucial mobilizing factors. This poses profound challenges at war’s end for such antagonistic communities to find once again a way to co-habit and coexist in their national territory. This requires erstwhile warring parties to address the injustices that have taken place, while also moving towards a relationship that they believe to be minimally acceptable. The recent proliferation of transitional justice instruments, such as Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and the International Criminal Court (ICC), attest to the widespread recognition of the crucial nexus between justice, reconciliation and sustainable peace.However, unfortunately the booming growth of this transitional justice and reconciliation industry has outpaced a careful development of empirically based theory and analysis on what reconciliation entails and how different transitional justice instruments contribute to this process.


Using the case study of northern Uganda, this collaborative research, proposed by experts within the field of conflict studies and international law, aims to fill the empirical and theoretical knowledge gap that exist within and between the field of transitional justice and reconciliation. To this end, the following central research question is posed; How do different types of local, national and international transitional justice instruments relate to each other and are they an effective. 


To contribute to this central research objective, the CCS will focus its expertise on answering the following question: What war constructed social identity boundaries exist within northern Uganda that need to be addressed for reconciliation to occur? What traditional instruments are already being utilized by the grass-roots society to address these boundaries? What retributive vs. restorative justice instruments are being implemented at a local, national and international level and what are their objectives and tools? Do these instruments build on the existing traditional instruments and are they an effective and legitimate mechanism towards reconciliation? What general lessons can be learned and applied to other (post) conflict settings?


Answers will be sought through literature research and conducting grass-roots research in northern Uganda. Building on data already collected during previous fieldwork, methods such as direct observation, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions will be utilized to gain a local perspective on the effectiveness and legitimacy of different transitional justice instruments, including the ICC, a national Truth Telling Commission and Traditional Justice Instruments.


ISEP in conjunction with the research programme Human Rights in a World of Conflict and Diversity Perspective will concentrate on the following question: how could international and national justice mechanisms most effectively contribute to societal reconciliation and the entrenchment of the rule of law in a victimized society as Uganda’s? To that end, it will be ascertained (a) whether international and domestic criminal tribunals somehow believe that criminal justice and accountability solutions can meaningfully contribute to national reconciliation in Uganda, and whether they decide cases accordingly; (b) whether justice for gross human rights violations/international crimes should be dispensed at the domestic (Ugandan) level, or rather at the international level (ICC, or even by a ‘bystander State’ exercising universal jurisdiction for that matter), in accordance with the principle of complementarity as enshrined in Article 17 of the ICC Statute. To that effect, the ICC’s relevant admissibility decisions will be thoroughly analyzed in light of relevant on-going and planned investigations and prosecutions in Uganda. In addition, interviews will be conducted with staff of the ICC Office of the Prosecutor in The Hague on the one hand, and Ugandan prosecutors on the other, with a view to seeking answers to the questions (a) how the ICC could best encourage local investigations in Uganda (in keeping with the principle of ‘positive complementarity’), (b) what cases should still be dealt with at the international level, (c) whether the broader impact of retributive justice solutions is taken into account in the design and implementation of those solutions; (d) how the interplay with non-penal transitional justice systems in Uganda is conceived

 
Role Project Leader & Researcher
Individual project description

For this project I conducted three months of field research in northern Uganda and wrote the following article;


Gould, L.M. and C.M.J. Ryngaert. 2012. The Interface Between Transitional Justice and Reconciliation in the Wake of Civil War: A Case Study of Northern Uganda. In L. Boerefijn, L. Henderson, R. Janse & R. Weaver (eds). Human Rights and Conflict. Essays in Honour of Bas de Gaay Fortman. Cambridge, Antwerp & Portland: Intersentia.

Funding
Utrecht University: Focus and Massa
Project members UU

 

 

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Currently dr. Lauren Gould teaches the following course(s):

I have taught the following courses since 2008:

Reconciliation after Civil War

Nationalism, Ethnicity and Conflict

International Conflict Mediation

Introduction Conflict Analysis

Conflict Resolution

Security Dilemmas

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Additional functions and activities

PhD representative within the Board of Studies, Humanities, PPO (PhD and Post Doc Overleg) and the PhD Council. Member of Team of Academic Skills (TASK)

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Full name
dr. L.M. Gould Contact details
Drift 6

Drift 6
Room 1.03
3512 BS  UTRECHT
The Netherlands


Drift 6

Drift 6
Room -
3512 BS  UTRECHT
The Netherlands


Drift 6

Drift 6
Room -
3512 BS  UTRECHT
The Netherlands


Drift 6

Drift 6
Room 1.01D
3512 BS  UTRECHT
The Netherlands


Phone number (direct) +31 30 253 6334
Postal address
Drift 6
3512 BS    UTRECHT
The Netherlands
Availability
Mo Tue Wed Thu Fr
Morning
Afternoon

Hoofdrichting adviseur Internationale Betrekkingen in Historsich Perspectief: inloop spreekuur voor LAS studenten op dinsdagen van 11:00-12:00. 

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Last updated 10.05.2017