dr. Esther Stouthamer
E.Stouthamer@uu.nl
Gegenereerd op 2017-09-26 16:48:36


Profile

My research focuses on the Holocene natural and human-influenced evolution of deltas over time scales ranging from 10 to 106 years. 

The general aims are:

1)    to determine and quantify the relative contributions of external forcings (tectonics, climate, sea level, water- and sediment inputs) and internal controls (e.g., avulsion, compaction, morphological succession) on the long-term development of deltas;

2)    to identify the key processes that control the long-term development of the delta;

3)    to quantify and predict the development of the 3D alluvial architecture of river deltas and the associated reservoir characteristics.

An important aspect of the overall aim is to investigate the evolution of the Rhine-Meuse delta over various time scales from the Tertiary to the present. The Rhine-Meuse delta and the database obtained from this delta forms a unique dataset enabling to study generic characteristics and controls in the evolution of deltas world-wide.

I am director of the research focus area Future Deltas.

Strategic themes / Focus areas
Involved in the following study programme(s)
Scientific expertise
deltas
fluvial geomorphology
subsidence
subsurface architecture and characterization
physical geography
Gegenereerd op 2017-09-26 16:48:36
All publications
  2017 - Scholarly publications
Pierik, H.J., Cohen, K.M., Vos, P.C., van der Spek, A.J.F. & Stouthamer, E. (02.04.2017). Late Holocene coastal-plain evolution of the Netherlands - the role of natural preconditions in human-induced sea ingressions. Proceedings of the Geologists Association, 128 (2), (pp. 180-197) (18 p.).
van Dinter, M., Cohen, K.M., Hoek, W.Z., Stouthamer, E., Jansma, E. & Middelkoop, H. (04.02.2017). Late Holocene lowland fluvial archives and geoarchaeology - Utrecht's case study of Rhine river abandonment under Roman and Medieval settlement . Quaternary Science Reviews
  2016 - Scholarly publications
Peeters, J., Busschers, F. S., Stouthamer, E., Bosch, J. H A, Van den Berg, M. W., Wallinga, J., Versendaal, A. J., Bunnik, F. P M & Middelkoop, H. (01.01.2016). Sedimentary architecture and chronostratigraphy of a late Quaternary incised-valley fill - A case study of the late Middle and Late Pleistocene Rhine system in the Netherlands. Quaternary Science Reviews, 131, (pp. 211-236) (26 p.).
Pierik, H.J., Cohen, K.M. & Stouthamer, E. (01.10.2016). A new GIS approach for reconstructing and mapping dynamic late Holocene coastal plain palaeogeography. Geomorphology, 270, (pp. 55-70) (16 p.).
Toonen, Willem H J, van Asselen, Sanneke, Stouthamer, Esther & Smith, Norman D. (01.01.2016). Depositional development of the Muskeg Lake crevasse splay in the Cumberland Marshes (Canada). Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 41 (1), (pp. 117-129) (13 p.).
  2016 - Other output
Pierik, H.J., Cohen, K.M. & Stouthamer, E. (19.04.2016). New generation of integrated geological-geomorphological reconstruction maps in the Rhine-Meuse delta, The Netherlands.
  2015 - Scholarly publications
Peeters, Jan, Busschers, Freek S. & Stouthamer, Esther (30.01.2015). Fluvial evolution of the Rhine during the last interglacial-glacial cycle in the southern North Sea basin - A review and look forward. Quaternary International, 357, (pp. 176-188) (13 p.).
Stouthamer, E. & van Asselen, S. (2015). Future Deltas Utrecht University research focus area: towards sustainable management of sinking deltas. Future Deltas Utrecht University research focus area: towards sustainable management of sinking deltas (pp. 179-182) (4 p.).
Stouthamer, E. & van Asselen, S. (2015). Potential of Holocene deltaic sequences for subsidence due to peat compaction. Potential of Holocene deltaic sequences for subsidence due to peat compaction (pp. 173-178) (6 p.).
Stouthamer, E., Cohen, K.M. & Hoek, W.Z. (2015). De vorming van het land - Geologie en geomorfologie. (434 p.). Utrecht: Perspectief Uitgevers, Completely revised 7th edition; continuation of Berendsen, H.J.A. (1996) and later editions of the same title. Academic text book..
van Asselen, S. & Stouthamer, E. (2015). Susceptibility of Holocene deltaic sequences for subsidence due to peat compaction. E-proceedings of the 36th IAHR World Congress IAHR.
  2015 - Professional publications
Stouthamer, E. (2015). Review WTI 2017: Stochastische Ondergrondschematisatie. (17 p.). Dept. Fysische Geografie, Universiteit Utrecht.
  2015 - Other output
Minderhoud, P.S.J., Erkens, G., van Pham, H., Vuong, & Stouthamer, E. (12.11.2015). Assessing the potential of the multi-aquifer subsurface of the Mekong Delta (Vietnam) for land subsidence due to groundwater extraction. (4 p.).
Pierik, H.J., Cohen, K.M., Vos, Peter C., van der Spek, A.J.F. & Stouthamer, E. (29.07.2015). Late Holocene coastal plain evolution in the Netherlands.
  2014 - Scholarly publications
Jansma, Esther, Cohen, Kim, Middelkoop, Hans, van Lanen, Rowin, Stouthamer, Esther, Pierik, Harm Jan, Gouw - Bouman, Marjolein, Hoek, Wim & Groenewoudt, Bert (2014). The Dark Age of the Lowlands in an interdisciplinary light - People, landscape and climate in The Netherlands between AD 300 and 1000. European Journal of Postclassical Archaeologies, (pp. 471-476).
Minderhoud, P.S.J., Stouthamer, E., van Asselen, S. & Erkens, G. (2014). Recommendations for monitoring and analyzing land subsidence for the Mekong delta and the Ho Chi Min city area, Vietnam. (5 p.).
  2014 - Professional publications
Baar, A.W., Kleinhans, M.G. & Stouthamer, E. (2014). Oeverstabiliteit Rivieren Oost Nederland - Opzet van een conceptueel model en aanzet tot projectmonitoring. (39 p.). Rijkswaterstaat Waterdienst.
  2014 - Other output
Middelkoop, Hans, van der Perk, Marcel, Cohen, Kim M., Stouthamer, Esther, Hoek, Wim Z., Kleinhans, Maarten G., Erkens, Gilles & Jansma, Esther (2014). Tracing the Anthropocene in the Rhine-Meuse delta. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 16. EGU General Assembly 2014.
  2013 - Scholarly publications
Sloff, C.J., van Spijk, A., Stouthamer, E. & Sieben, A. (2013). Understanding and managing the morphology of branches incising into sand-clay deposits in the Dutch Rhine Delta. International Journal of Sediment Research, 28, (pp. 127-138) (12 p.).
  2013 - Other output
E. Stouthamer (17.09.2013) Erodibiliteit en risico op zettingsvloeiing als maat voor stabiliteit van oevers, onderwatertaluds en rivierbodem van de Lek
E. Stouthamer (19.11.2013) Peat compaction within Holocene delta sequences
E. Stouthamer (14.07.2013) Revised palaeogeographical reconstruction and avulsion history of the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta, The Netherlands
  2012 - Scholarly publications
Stouthamer, E., Hoek, W.Z. & Cohen, K.M. (2012). Mapping of the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta - The 'Berendsen Map'. In P. Floor (Eds.), Dutch Earth Sciences. Development an impact. Royal Geological and Mining Society of the Netherlands 1912-2012 Centenary volume (pp. 176) (273 p.). The Hague: Royal Geological and Mining Society of the Netherlands.
  2012 - Professional publications
Cohen, K.M. & Stouthamer, E. (2012). Vernieuwd Digitaal Basisbestand Paleogeografie van de Rijn-Maas Delta - Beknopte toelichting bij het Digitaal Basisbestand Paleogeografie van de Rijn-Maas Delta. (42 p.). Utrecht: Dept. Fysische Geografie, Universiteit Utrecht, NWO-ALW Meerwaarde project 840.11.004: Vernieuwd Digitaal Basisbestand Paleogeografie van de Rijn-Maas Delta.
Stouthamer, E. (2012). Contribution: advise on bike routes, supply knowledge on Late Pleistocene and Holocene development of the area and edit text and figures. In Smit, E. (Eds.), Fietsen door verdwenen rivieren. Aardkundige fietsroute Bunnik
  2012 - Other output
Cohen, K. M., Stouthamer, E., Hoek, W. Z. & Middelkoop, H. (01.04.2012). 100 years of mapping the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta plain: combining research and teaching. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 14 (EGU2012-5747). EGU General Assembly 2012 .
E. Stouthamer (07.10.2012) Abandonment overprints on channel belt architecture in the Upper and Central Rhine Delta, the Netherlands
E. Stouthamer (03.09.2012) Separation anxious rivers: Abandonment overprints on channel belt architecture In the upper and Central Rhine Delta, the Netherlands.
  2011 - Scholarly publications
Bos, I.J. & Stouthamer, E. (2011). Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Sand-Containing Basin Fills in the Holocene Rhine-Meuse. Journal of Geology, 119 (6), (pp. 641-660) (20 p.).
Sloff, C.J., van Spijk, A., Stouthamer, E. & Sieben, A. (06.09.2011). Understanding and managing the morphology of Rhine Delta branches incising into sand-clay deposits. In X. Shao, Z. Wang & G. Wang (Eds.), Proceedings 7th RCEM Symposium (pp. paper C1016) (1 p.). Beijing, China: Tsinghua University, 7th RCEM Symposium, Beijing China.
Stouthamer, E., Cohen, K.M. & Gouw, M.J.P. (2011). Avulsion and its implications for fluvial-deltaic architecture: insights from the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta. In S.K. Davidson, S. Leleu & C.P. North (Eds.), From River to Rock Record: The preservation of fluvial sediments and their subsequent interpretation (pp. 215-232) (18 p.). Society for Sedimentary Geology, chapter 11.
Stouthamer, E., Pierik, H.J. & Cohen, K.M. (2011). Substrate geology affecting local erodibility in the bed of the river Lek (Rhine delta, The Netherlands). In E. Mostert (Eds.), NCR-days 2011; Controlling the Dutch Rivers - Book of Abstracts (pp. 46) (1 p.). Delft: NCR - Netherlands Centre for River Studies.
van Asselen, S., Karssenberg, D. & Stouthamer, E. (20.12.2011). Contribution of peat compaction to relative sea-level rise within Holocene deltas. Geophysical Research Letters, 38 (L2441), (pp. 1-5) (5 p.).
  2011 - Professional publications
Cohen, K.M., Middelkoop, H. & Stouthamer, E. (2011). Reactie op consultatie Wet Basisregistratie ondergrond. (10 p.). Utrecht: Dept. Fysische Geografie / Universiteit Utrecht.
Hoogvliet, M., Gunnink, J. & Stouthamer, E. (2011). Kartering geschiktheid van ondergrond voor bouwen in provincie Utrecht. Utrecht: Deltares.
Stouthamer, E. & de Haas, T. (2011). Erodibiliteit en risico op zettingsvloeiing als maat voor stabiliteit van oevers, onderwatertaluds en rivierbodems van de Oude Maas, de Noord en het Spui. Utrecht: Dept. Fysische Geografie / Universiteit Utrecht.
Stouthamer, E., Pierik, H.J. & Cohen, K.M. (2011). Erodibiliteit en kans op het ontstaan van zettingsvloeiing als maat voor stabiliteit van oevers, onderwatertaluds en rivierbodem van de Lek. (49 p.). Utrecht: Dept. Fysische Geografie / Universiteit Utrecht.
Stouthamer, E., Pierik, H.J. & Cohen, K.M. (2011). Lithologische opbouw van de ondergrond. Utrecht: Dept. Fysische Geografie / Universiteit Utrecht.
  2011 - Other output
E. Stouthamer (06.09.2011) Understanding and managing the morphology of Rhine Delta branches incising into sand-clay deposits
  2010 - Scholarly publications
Stouthamer, E. (2010). Book of Abstracts. Delft: NCR, NCR Days 2010.
van Asselen, S., Stouthamer, E. & Smith, N.D. (2010). Factors controlling the amount and rate of peat compaction on timescales of 10-100 years (Cumberland Marshes, Canada). Journal of Sedimentary Research, 80, (pp. 155-166) (12 p.).
van Asselen, Sanneke, Stouthamer, Esther & Smith, Norman D. (2010). Factors controlling peat compaction in alluvial floodplains - A case study in the cold-temperate Cumberland Marshes, Canada. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 80 (1-2), (pp. 155-166) (12 p.).
  2010 - Professional publications
Boerefijn, M., de Groot, I.A. & Stouthamer, E. (2010). Toelichting Grondwatertrappenkaart Veengebieden provincie Utrecht, schaal 1:25.000. Utrecht: Universiteit Utrecht.
Stouthamer, E. (2010). Avulsies. Natuurwetenschap & Techniek
Stouthamer, E., Cohen, K.M. & Gouw, M.J.P. (04.05.2010). Avulsion and its implications for fluvial-deltaic architecture: insights from the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta. In SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) (Eds.), SEPM Special Publication (pp. 215-231) (17 p.). Stavanger, NPF meeting From Depositional Sysems to Sedimentatry Successions on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.
  2010 - Popularising publications
Stouthamer, E. (2010). Rivierdynamiek in de holocene Rijn-Maas delta. Geografie, 6 (de Rijn), (pp. 15-17) (3 p.).
  2010 - Other output
E. Stouthamer (22.04.2010) Facies distribution and preservation potential in near-coastal deltaic settings, translating process relationships and deposit characteristics of a Holocene to an Eemian setting in The Netherlands
E. Stouthamer (30.09.2010) River mouth drowning under rapid sea level rise: Rhine delta geological lessons
E. Stouthamer (05.09.2010) The Rhine's Holocene deltaic re-annexation of the IJssel valley (Pleistocene, Netherlands)
  2009 - Scholarly publications
Hijma, M.P., Cohen, K.M., Hoffmann, G., van der Spek, A.J.F. & Stouthamer, E. (2009). From river valley to estuary: the evolution of the Rhine mouth in the early to middle Holocene (western Netherlands, Rhine-Meuse delta). Geologie en Mijnbouw/Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, 88 (1), (pp. 13-53) (41 p.).
van Asselen, S., Stouthamer, E. & van Asch, Th. W. J. (2009). Effects of peat compaction on delta evolution - A review on processes, responses, measuring and modeling. Earth-Science Reviews, 92 (1-2), (pp. 35-51) (17 p.).
van Asselen, S., Stouthamer, E. & van Asch, Th.W.J. (2009). Effects of peat compaction on delta evolution: a review on processes, responses, measuring and modeling. Earth-Science Reviews, 92, (pp. 35-51) (17 p.).
  2009 - Professional publications
Cohen, K.M., Stouthamer, E., Hoek, W.Z., Berendsen, H.J.A. & Kempen, H.F.J. (2009). Zand in Banen - Zanddieptekaarten van het Rivierengebied en het IJsseldal in de provincies Gelderland en Overijssel. (130 p.). Arnhem: Provincie Gelderland.
  2008 - Scholarly publications
Hudson, P.F., Middelkoop, H. & Stouthamer, E. (2008). Flood Management Along the Lower Mississippi (USA) and Rhine Rivers (The Netherlands) and the Continuum of Geomorphic Adjustment. Geomorphology, 101 ((1-2)), (pp. 209-236) (28 p.).
Stouthamer, E. (2008). De vorming van het land – Inleiding in de geologie en de geomorfologie by H.J.A. Berendsen. (420 p.). Assen: Koninklijke Van Gorcum.
Stouthamer, E. (2008). Landschap in delen - Overzicht van de geofactoren by H.J.A. Berendsen. (340 p.). Assen: Koninklijke Van Gorcum.
Stouthamer, E. (2008). Landschappelijk Nederland by H.J.A. Berendsen. (247 p.). Assen: Koninklijke Van Gorcum.
van Asselen, S. & Stouthamer, E. (2008). Effects of peat compaction on floodplain morphology and delta evolution, a field study in the Cumberland Marshes, Canada. Geophysical Research Abstracts EGU General Assembly 2008.
van Asselen, S. & Stouthamer, E. (2008). Peat Archives: The Key To Unravel The Influence Of Peat Compaction On Delta Evolution. Eos Trans. AGU AGU.
  2008 - Professional publications
Stouthamer, E., Berendsen, H.J.A., Bouman, M.T.I.J. & Peeters, J. (2008). Bodemkaart van de veengebieden in de provincie Utrecht, schaal 1:25.000. (60 p.). Utrecht: Provincie Utrecht.
Volleberg, K.P. & Stouthamer, E. (2008). Geomorfologisch onderzoek Ruimte voor de rivieren Deventer Bolwerksweide, Ossenwaarden en De Worp. Utrecht: Dept. Fysische Geografie, Universiteit Utrecht.
Volleberg, K.P. & Stouthamer, E. (2008). Geomorfologisch onderzoek Ruimte voor de rivieren Deventer Keizers- en Stobbenwaarden. Utrecht: Dept. Fysische Geografie, Universiteit Utrecht.
  2008 - Other output
E. Stouthamer (05.08.2008) Early Holocene sea-level rise and sedimentary architecture of the Rhine mouth (Rotterdam area, Netherlands)
  2007 - Scholarly publications
Berendsen, H.J.A., Cohen, K.M. & Stouthamer, E. (2007). The use of GIS in reconstructing the Holocene palaeogeography of the Rhine-Meuse delta, The Netherlands. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 21, (pp. 589-602) (14 p.).
Kombrink, H., Bridge, J. & Stouthamer, E. (2007). The alluvial architecture of the Coevorden Field (Upper Carboniferous), The Netherlands. Geologie en Mijnbouw/Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, 86 (1), (pp. 3-14) (12 p.).
Middelkoop, H., Stouthamer, E. & Hoek, W. Z. (2007). Geomorphology and climate - In honour of Professor Dr Eduard A. Koster. Geologie en Mijnbouw/Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, 86 (3), (pp. 161-164).
Middelkoop, H., Stouthamer, E. & Hoek, W.Z. (2007). Geomorhpology and Climate - in honour of Professor Dr Eduard A. Koster. Geologie en Mijnbouw/Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, 86 (3), (pp. 161-164) (4 p.).
Stouthamer, E. & Berendsen, H.J.A. (2007). Avulsion, an autogenic or allogenic controlled process?. Sedimentary Geology, 198, (pp. 309-325) (17 p.).
van Asselen, S. & Stouthamer, E. (2007). New methods to quantify land subsidence due to peat compaction (Cumberland Marshes, Canada). Netherlands Centre for River Studies
van Asselen, S. & Stouthamer, E. (2007). Reconstruction of Holocene compaction rates and its effects on alluvial architecture. Conference proceedings NCR-Days 2006
  2007 - Other output
E. Stouthamer (02.11.2007) De ontwikkeling van de Holocene Rijn-Maas delta en de toepassing van deze kennis in duurzaam rivierbeheer
E. Stouthamer (23.10.2007) Palaeogeography of the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta: Complete stratigraphical coverage of a sizable coastal prism
  2006 - Scholarly publications
Stouthamer, E. & Berendsen, H.J.A. (2006). Avulsion, the relative roles of autogenic and allogenic processes. Sedimentary Geology, 198 (3), (pp. 309-325) (17 p.).
Stouthamer, E., van Asselen, S., van Asch, T.W.J. & Kruse, G. (2006). Reconstuction of Holocene compaction rates and its effects on alluvial architecture in the Rhine-Meuse delta, The Netherlands. Netherlands Centre for River Studies
van Asselen, S. & Stouthamer, E. (2006). Reconstruction of Holocene compaction rates and its effects on alluvial architecture. Netherlands Centre for River Studies
  2005 - Scholarly publications
Middelkoop, H., Schoor, M.M., Wolfert, H.P., Maas, G.J. & Stouthamer, E. (2005). Targets for ecological rehabilitation of the lower Rhine and Meuse based on a historic-geomorphologic reference. Archiv fur Hydrobiologie, Suppl. 155 (1-4), (pp. 63-88) (26 p.).
Stouthamer, E. (2005). Reoccupation of channel belts and its influence on alluvial architecture in the holocene Rhine-Meuse Delta, the Netherlands. In L. Giosan & J. Bhattacharya (Eds.), River Deltas-Concepts, Models, and Examples (pp. 319-339) (21 p.). Tulsa, Oklahoma: SEPM.
  2003 - Scholarly publications
Mendez, G., Perez-Arlucea, M., Stouthamer, E. & Berendsen, H.J.A. (2003). The TESS-1 suction corer: a new device to extract wet, uncompacted sediments. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 73 (6), (pp. 1078-1081) (4 p.).
Stouthamer, E. (2003). Avulsie (description). In A. Goudie (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Geomorphology (1400 p.). Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.
  2003 - Professional publications
Middelkoop, H., Stouthamer, E., Schoor, M.M., Wolfert, H.P. & Maas, G.J. (2003). Kansrijkdom voor rivierecotopen vanuit historisch-geomorfologisch perspectief. Rijntakken - Maas - Benedenrivieren. (124 p.). Utrecht, Arnhem, Wageningen: NCR.
Schoor, M.M. & Stouthamer, E. (2003). Ecomorfologische kartering van de Rijntakken in Nederland. Arnhem/Lelystad: RIZA.
Schoor, M.M., van der Veen, R. & Stouthamer, E. (2003). Historische rivierkundige parameters; Maas, Merwede, Hollandsch Diep en Haringvliet. (165 p.). Arnhem: RIZA.
  2002 - Scholarly publications
Berendsen, H.J.A. & Stouthamer, E. (2002). Palaeographic evolution and avulsion history of the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta, the Netherlands. Geologie en Mijnbouw/Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, 81 (1), (pp. 97-112) (16 p.).
Cohen, K.M., Stouthamer, E. & Berendsen, H.J.A. (2002). Fluvial deposits as a record for neotectonic activity in the Rhine-Meuse delta, the Netherlands. Geologie en Mijnbouw/Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, 81 (3-4), (pp. 389-405) (17 p.).
  2002 - Professional publications
Bolwidt, L. & Stouthamer, E. (2002). Kribvaksuppletie en zandverstuiving langs de Waal, een verkenning van de mogelijkheden voor de ontwikkeling van rivierduinen. (153 p.). Arnhem: Rijksinstituut voor zoetwaterbeheer en afvalwaterbehandeling, werkdocument.
  2001 - Scholarly publications
Berendsen, H.J.A. & Stouthamer, E. (2001). Palaeographic developments of the Rhine-Meuse delta. Assen: Koninklijke Van Gorkum.
Berendsen, H.J.A., Cohen, K.M. & Stouthamer, E. (2001). Maps and cross-sections. In H.J.A. Berendsen & E. Stouthamer (Eds.), Palaeogeographic development of the Rhine-Meuse delta, the Netherlands (pp. 49-54). Assen: Koninklijke Van Gorcum.
Stouthamer, E. (2001). Sedimentary products of avulsions in the Holocene Rhine-Meuse Delta, The Netherlands. Sedimentary Geology, 145 (Issues 1-2), (pp. 73-92) (20 p.).
Stouthamer, E. & Berendsen, H.J.A. (2001). Avulsion frequency, avulsion duration and interavulsion period of holocene channel belts in the Rhine-Meuse delta, The Netherlands. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 71 (4), (pp. 589-598) (10 p.).
  2000 - Popularising publications
Berendsen, H.J.A., Cohen, K.M. & Stouthamer, E. (2000). Het ontstaan van de Rijn-Maas delta. Aarde & Mens, 4 (4), (pp. 3-10).
  0 - Other output
E. Stouthamer () From river valley to estuary: the evolution of the Rhine mouth in the early to middle Holocene (western Netherlands, Rhine-Meuse delta)
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Gegenereerd op 2017-09-26 16:48:36
Project:
Piping in practice – Quantifying how subsurface heterogeneity affects piping processes below dikes using combined in 3D subsurface composition and groundwater flow models.
01.10.2016 to 01.12.2020
General project description 

Piping is a process of seepage-induced transport of sand underneath river dikes that could occur when rivers flood and can make dikes fail. Prediction of piping risk at delta scale is difficult because it demands detailed knowledge on composition of the natural substrate below the dike, e.g. grain size distribution, sorting and layering and on the way seepage water flows through this; horizontally, diagonally, via preferential paths. This project aims to identify locations of increased piping-risk below river dikes of the Dutch delta. The methods involve improved mapping of substrate below dikes throughout the delta, measurement of hydraulic characteristics of the subsurface at field test locations, and full-3D hi-res numerical modeling of the piping process. This will result in faster and more cost-efficient identification of piping-risk locations and better-informed calculation of dike stability, needed to maintain safety standards along 100-kms of dike.

Role Co-promotor & Project Leader Funding
Other grant (government funding): STW
Project members UU
External project members:
  • dr. Marc Hijma - Deltares
  • dr. Vera van Beek - Deltares
Project:
Rise and Fall: strategies for the subsiding and urbanising Mekong Delta (Vietnam) facing increasing salt water intrusion
01.09.2014 to 31.08.2018
General project description 

This project aims to enhance the capabilities of individuals and organisations to develop sustainable strategies for dealing with groundwater extraction, land subsidence and salt water intrusion in the increasingly urbanising Mekong Delta (Vietnam). We will enlarge the knowledge base of stakeholders (including policy makers, water managers and scientists) and work with them to develop and implement innovative tools and technologies in practice and policy. A new integrated delta model will be developed, linking surface water, groundwater and geo-mechanical models, to analyse the interrelated character of groundwater extraction, subsidence levels and salt water intrusion. Together with stakeholders the new and comprehensive model will be constructed and applied to quantify the effects of water management strategies in the Mekong Delta. Stakeholders will analyse and develop adequate strategies by simulating and demonstrating the effects of development scenarios and policy recommendations, such as expressed in the Mekong Delta Plan (2013).

Role Co-promotor & Researcher Funding
NWO grant: Urbanizing Deltas of the World programme
Project members UU
Project:
The Dark Age of the Lowlands in an interdisciplinary light
01.12.2012 to 01.09.2019
General project description 

This research programme focuses on a period of severe pan-European economic and demographic change: the Late Roman Period (AD 300-500) and Early Middle Ages (AD 500- 1000). Physical-geographical and biogeological data point at marked climatic variability and changing landscapes during this time interval. In geomorphologically sensitive regions such as river deltas and coastal areas these changes must have had a noticeable impact on the location and lay-out of urban centres and rural settlements, land use and subsistence strategies, and connections of population centres to their economical ‘hinterland’. Recent developments in digital infrastructure in the Humanities and Geosciences in the Netherlands for the first time enable us to study these phenomena from an interregional and interdisciplinary perspective.


We study how settlement dynamics, land use, infrastructure, demography and trade between AD 300 and 1000 were related to changes of the landscape and climate, focusing on the Lowlands’ geomorphologically most sensitive regions. This reconstruction takes place within three complementary PhD-projects, in the realms of archaeology, physical geography and biogeology. Project A focuses on occupation patterns and land use in coastal, river and Pleistocene sandy regions, project B on natural geomorphologic landscape dynamics in these regions, and project C on vegetation changes and climate.


Results will be synthesized in an interdisciplinary reconstruction of the interactions between cultural and environmental dynamics in the Lowlands between AD 300 and 1000 in a broader northwest-European context. The study will greatly improve the archaeological understanding of dynamics in the Early Medieval Lowlands and strongly enhance the framework for future research of this key period.

Role Co-promotor
Individual project description

Project B focuses on dynamic landscapes in the Lowlands during the Late Holocene. In the coastal area, many new sea ingressions took place mainly as a result of occupation of the peat rim in the coastal plain. In the delta plain area, flooding frequency and sediment supply increased, coinciding with changing river patterns forming the main rivers we know today (Lek, Waal, Gelderse IJssel). In the Pleistocene sand area, drift sands occur as soon as population rises in the Early Middle Ages. This project will determine the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic factors in landscape evolution.


Detailed digital landscape reconstructions are compiled for the coastal plain and fluvial area. Showing the landscape setting development during the Late Holocene. The timing of the river avulsions is refined using accurate dating strategies. Occupation dynamics in relation to the landscape developments is evaluated. For the pleistocene area the project will focus on the development of drift sands which will be related to occupation and vegetation development.

Funding
NWO grant: NWO-Humanities
Project members UU
External project members:
  • Prof. dr. ir. Theo Spek - University of Groningen
  • Dr. Bert Groenewoudt - Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands
  • Drs. Menne Kosian - Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands
Project:
Facies distribution and preservation potential in near-coastal deltaic settings, translating process relationships and deposit characteristics of a Holocene to an Eemian setting
01.11.2010 to 01.12.2017
General project description 

The aim of this project is to characterize deposits, of Holocene (10,000-0 yr BP) and Eemian age (130,000-115,000 yr BP), that were originally formed in near-coastal areas. The main objectives are: (1) sedimentological and architectural characterisation of near-coastal areas, (2) determination of the preservation potential of Eemian deposits relative to Holocene deposits, (3) translation of process relationships and deposit characteristics of a Holocene near-coastal setting to an Eemian near-coastal setting, and 4) determination of sequence stratigraphic and reservoir modelling implications. In this project we use the huge datasets available at UtrechtUniversity and TNO to characterize the architecture of the near-coastal deposits from the modern (Holocene) and last-interglacial (Eemian) high stand coastal barrier-lagoon-deltaic plain system at the mouth of the River Rhine in the southern North SeaBasin. Cores, core descriptions, well logs, and seismic sections are used to characterize the Holocene and Eemian deposits. 


 

Role Co-promotor & Project Leader Funding
Utrecht University
Project members UU
External project members:
  • dr. Freek Busschers - TNO Geological Survey of the Netherlands
  • dr. Allard Martinius - Statoil
Project:
Delta Evolution / Rhine-Meuse Delta Studies
01.01.2005 to 31.12.2020
General project description 

Delta Evolution is the label we use since 2005, for the Utrecht University research line in Lowland Geomorphology and Quaternary Geology, carried out by the Department of Physical Geography, in cooperation with other institutes. Delta Evolution is also the label put on the strategic research cooperation (since 2008) of the group with departments in Deltares Research Institute and TNO Geological Survey of the Netherlands, that have their offices on the Utrecht science campus too. The Delta Evolution program also connects to the network of alumni of Physical Geographers and Quaternary Geologists active in commercial consultancy companies and governmental agencies in the field of water management, hydrology, civil engineering, nature conservation and archaeology in The Netherlands and to colleagues at other universities - with whom we collaborate in shared projects. Our research and networks extend to deltas internationally - see the pages of the Future Deltas focus area for example. 


The Netherlands and the Rhine-Meuse delta in it are strongholds for our research. Our scientific research treats this delta as the mega-case, to draw smaller cases from - and to compare with other delta systems (other mega-cases) to test and validate what part of our insights are delta-specific and what is generic. The lowlands that the program focuses on include: delta plains, coastal plains, larger river valleys, peat wetlands, lagoon and fenlands and so on. These areas connect to upstream catchments and coastal marine systems downstream. Besides holding sedimentary and geomorphic record of their dynamic formation (lowland genesis, natural and human impacts thereon), the lowlands are also archives that recorded change of the upstream catchment (size of floods and amounts of sediment received), the coastal system (transgression, tides, barrier coasts, storms), the climate system (storms, precipitation, temperature), the biological system (vegetation and fauna, aquatic, riparian, terrestrial), the deeper earth (neoteconics, glaciohydro-isostasy), and archeological history (finds, sites, use of landscape). This feeds interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research. Also, the better the build-up, making-of and age of the lowlands is understood (data integration, synthesis), the better the archives and science based on becomes (duplication, cross-validation, stacking). This is a main reason to carry-over mapping and dating knowledge from individual projects to Delta Evolution's living datasets, that in turn feed into new projects.


Delta Evolution as an umbrella programma, bundles series of PhD/Postdoc projects and contract-research projects and includes long-term dataset management from and between these projects. Goals in Delta Evolution at present are:


1. Perform novel scientific research in Geomorphology and Quaternary Geology of lowland areas,



  • by using and expanding the present datasets (already huge and of high quality) and knowledge (from several disciplines), 

  • by exploring the limits of our process-understanding and innovate the techniques of modelling geomorphology to cover longer timescales (1000-100,000 years), 

  • by pushing the resolution and accuracy of our mapping and dating, and innovate the techniques that combine these (GIS palaeogeography, 3D/4D geomodelling),

  • by striving to time-slice the evolution of deltas and quantify rates of morphological, sedimentary and hydrological change as they were changing over time (thus documenting shifts in controls)

  • by addressing research questions on the delta system at nested spatial, temporal and functional scales (whole delta, individual branches and swamps, fluvial vs. tidal affected reaches, human-impacted, semi-natural, natural parts of the system's suites of environments and processes; transgressive vs high-stand periods).

  • by combining new-collected data from field- and lab work with existing data, statistical analysis and physical numerical modelling.


2.  Synchronize the academic delta research with applied research activities



  • by valorizing new scientific insights early on in national mapping projects and geological/geotechnical/geohydrological advice.

  • by making early use of data-collection opportunities arising from larger infrastructural projects in the Netherlands delta, in academic research.

  • by topping up scientific research with contract-research and vice-versa: have exchange of input data, syncing the interpretation, and reviewing the data output.

  • by releasing high-quality data-sets and update these from time to time: take-in, monitoring and review of applied and academic research results from 3rd parties.

  • by taking up advisory roles, if possible in early stages, in projects that demand geological-geomorphological  information for plannig and decision making.

  • by connecting the Delta Evolution research output to internationally actual themes such as: global change, sustainability, climate change, sea-level change and land subsidence, delta urbanisation, environmental pressure, groundwater demand, hydrocarbon demand, ecological demand, interdisciplinarity science demand. See the pages of the Future Deltas focus area for examples. 


 

Role Researcher Funding
Other
Project members UU
External project members:
  • Deltares
  • TNO Geologische Dienst Nederland

Completed projects

Project:
Peat properties in 3D geological mapping of the Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta 01.02.2013 to 31.01.2017
General project description

The research aims to develop a generic method to characterise, map in space and time, and digitally share the physical properties of Holocene peaty deposits present in the Rhine-Meuse delta in the Netherlands. The research builds on earlier projects carried out in the Delta Evolution umbrella research programme in which UU, TNO and Deltares take part, and the '4D geomodelling' project at TNO Geological Survey of the Netherlands.


The 3D approach to mapping the compacted, varying natural successions of peat in the range of organo-clastic sedimentary environments that the Rhine-Meuse delta and adjacent coastal plain hosts, serves to increase our understanding of lowland landscape evolution in larger deltas during transgression and high stand situations, and human cultivation effects in such areas. This provides fundamental insights regarding the functioning of drowning deltas and resulting deposition. This serves mapping the subsurface of deltas (for water and subsidence management), using subrecent deltas as analogues in reservoir geology (for hydrocarbon exploitation) and using deltas for agriculture and as urban areas. To be able to confidently hindcast age and compaction history at any location in the Dutch delta as a 3D-mapped attributes will offer geo-engineers, delta-geologists and archaeologists important new a-priori assessment opportunities (prospection, site-selection, risk-analysis). Knowledge of human impact on peat properties as accumulated so far answers economic/societally-relevant questions regarding the CO2 budgets, safety against flooding and food security in the present and nearby future.

 
Role Co-promotor Funding
External funding: TNO Geological Survey of the Netherlands
Project members UU
External project members:
  • dr. Jan Stafleu (TNO - Geologische Dienst van Nederland)
  • dr. Freek S. Busschers (TNO - Geologische Dienst van Nederland)
Project:
Living on subsiding peat soils in coastal zones 01.02.2015 to 04.10.2016
General project description

This is a pilot project of the UU research focus area Future Deltas. We study subsidence due to peat compaction and oxidation in built-up areas in three villages in the central part of the Rhine-Meuse delta, The Netherlands. Built-up areas are typically avoided because sealed surfaces and restricted property access hamper investigation the subsurface. These areas are however heavily impacted by land subsidence, and therefore, with an increasing number of people living on peaty soils, understanding processes leading to subsidence is critical. 


We made cross sections based on logged borehole data to reveal the lithological composition of the Holocene sequence underlying the villages. At selected sites, representing different land uses and subsurface composition, cores were extracted to determine current compaction conditions of peat layers, based on high-resolution bulk density measurements. Oxidation conditions of selected peat samples were determined based on respiration measurements. Derived information on compaction and oxidation conditions, along with data from previous studies, allowed to assess the relative contribution of both processes under different settings regarding loading and groundwater level. In addition, we assessed the potential for future land subsidence at our study sites under different development scenarios. Ultimately, insights derived from this study can be used for developing sustainable management strategies for inhabited organo-clastic coastal zones worldwide.






 
Role Researcher Funding
Utrecht University: Funded by Future Deltas
Project members UU
Project:
The impact of avulsion on local groundwater table and peat formation in organo-clastic delta plains during the Middle Holocene transgression 01.02.2015 to 01.08.2016
General project description

By the relocation of water and sediment on delta plains, avulsions of river branches have major environmental impacts, notably in changing hydrological and peat-forming conditions in flood basins. The central part of the Rhine-Meuse delta with its extensive databases including detailed lithological data and high-resolution age control offers a unique opportunity to study Middle Holocene avulsion impacts on flood basin groundwater table and peat formation. Downstream tidal-affected, and upstream neotectonics-affected, parts of the delta are less suitable areas for isolating avulsion impact on flood basin groundwater table change.


Avulsion was the dominant control causing accelerations of ‘local’ flood basin groundwater table rise. This is evident from comparing reconstructions of local groundwater table rise for multiple flood basins with regionally-averaged reconstructions. Flood basin type (lacustrine versus terrestrial wetland), size and openness, partly through effects on discharge dispersal, affect how strongly local groundwater tables respond to avulsion-diverted incoming discharge. Furthermore, cross sections of the studied cases repeatedly indicate a shift from high-organic wood peat to low-organic reed peat formation in the vicinity of the avulsed river, resulting from a shift in water table regime and nutrient status.


Avulsion impact on wetland flood basins were most pronounced between ca 6000-4000 years ago, when rates of base level rise slowed down, at the time of transition of transgressive to high stand stage. Associated flood basin compartmentalization resulted in smaller and more confined flood basins. In these circumstances, avulsions by way of environmental impacts on groundwater tables and vegetation, affect heterogeneity in flood basin facies. 

 
Role Researcher Funding
Utrecht University
Project members UU
Project:
Peat compaction in deltas: Implications for Holocene delta evolution 01.02.2006 to 01.02.2010
General project description

The main objective of this PhD research was to quantify subsidence due to peat compaction in different Holocene fluvial-deltaic settings, and to evaluate effects of peat compaction on delta evolution. For this purpose, field research has been carried out in the Cumberland Marshes (Canada), the Rhine-Meuse delta (The Netherlands) and the Biebrza National Park (Poland). Additionally, a new numerical peat compaction model calibrated with an extensive field dataset has been developed.


The amount and rate of subsidence due to peat compaction in Holocene deltas are highly variable in space and time, reflecting the commonly heterogeneous composition of Holocene deltaic sequences. This variability mainly depends on local variations in the effective stress, thickness of the peat layer and the organic matter content of peat. We measured up to 3 m subsidence due to compaction of peat underneath a natural levee in the Rhine-Meuse delta. Locally, peat is compacted up to ca. 60%. Compaction rates may be as high as 15 mm/yr, determined at decades to centennial timescales.  


Peat compaction affects alluvial architecture, for example by promoting the formation of locally thick overbank deposits, such as natural levees. Moreover, peat compaction underneath channels promotes vertical aggradation leading to channel belts with a low width/depth ratio. At a regional scale, peat compaction revitalizes accommodation space, thereby increasing the sediment trap efficiency and slowing down delta propagation. 


In modern deltas, human activities increase amounts and rates of subsidence due to peat compaction, due to loading by buildings and infrastructure, and artificial groundwater level lowering for land reclamation. This may cause subsidence rates in the order of cm/year.


 

 
Role Researcher Funding
NWO grant
Project members UU
Project:
Peat compaction in deltas: Implications for Holocene delta evolution 01.02.2006 to 01.02.2010
General project description

The main objective of this PhD research was to quantify subsidence due to peat compaction in different Holocene fluvial-deltaic settings, and to evaluate effects of peat compaction on delta evolution. For this purpose, field research has been carried out in the Cumberland Marshes (Canada), the Rhine-Meuse delta (The Netherlands) and the Biebrza National Park (Poland). Additionally, a new numerical peat compaction model calibrated with an extensive field dataset has been developed.


The amount and rate of subsidence due to peat compaction in Holocene deltas are highly variable in space and time, reflecting the commonly heterogeneous composition of Holocene deltaic sequences. This variability mainly depends on local variations in the effective stress, thickness of the peat layer and the organic matter content of peat. We measured up to 3 m subsidence due to compaction of peat underneath a natural levee in the Rhine-Meuse delta. Locally, peat is compacted up to ca. 60%. Compaction rates may be as high as 15 mm/yr, determined at decades to centennial timescales.  


Peat compaction affects alluvial architecture, for example by promoting the formation of locally thick overbank deposits, such as natural levees. Moreover, peat compaction underneath channels promotes vertical aggradation leading to channel belts with a low width/depth ratio. At a regional scale, peat compaction revitalizes accommodation space, thereby increasing the sediment trap efficiency and slowing down delta propagation. 


In modern deltas, human activities increase amounts and rates of subsidence due to peat compaction, due to loading by buildings and infrastructure, and artificial groundwater level lowering for land reclamation. This may cause subsidence rates in the order of cm/year.

 
Role Researcher Funding
NWO grant
Project members UU
Project:
Peat compaction in deltas: Implications for Holocene delta evolution 01.02.2006 to 01.02.2010
General project description

The main objective of this PhD research was to quantify subsidence due to peat compaction in different Holocene fluvial-deltaic settings, and to evaluate effects of peat compaction on delta evolution. For this purpose, field research has been carried out in the Cumberland Marshes (Canada), the Rhine-Meuse delta (The Netherlands) and the Biebrza National Park (Poland). Additionally, a new numerical peat compaction model calibrated with an extensive field dataset has been developed.


The amount and rate of subsidence due to peat compaction in Holocene deltas are highly variable in space and time, reflecting the commonly heterogeneous composition of Holocene deltaic sequences. This variability mainly depends on local variations in the effective stress, thickness of the peat layer and the organic matter content of peat. We measured up to 3 m subsidence due to compaction of peat underneath a natural levee in the Rhine-Meuse delta. Locally, peat is compacted up to ca. 60%. Compaction rates may be as high as 15 mm/yr, determined at decades to centennial timescales.  


Peat compaction affects alluvial architecture, for example by promoting the formation of locally thick overbank deposits, such as natural levees. Moreover, peat compaction underneath channels promotes vertical aggradation leading to channel belts with a low width/depth ratio. At a regional scale, peat compaction revitalizes accommodation space, thereby increasing the sediment trap efficiency and slowing down delta propagation. 


In modern deltas, human activities increase amounts and rates of subsidence due to peat compaction, due to loading by buildings and infrastructure, and artificial groundwater level lowering for land reclamation. This may cause subsidence rates in the order of cm/year.

 
Role Researcher Funding
NWO grant
Project members UU
Gegenereerd op 2017-09-26 16:48:37
Additional functions and activities

Member Programme Committee of the National Center for River Studies

Gegenereerd op 2017-09-26 16:48:37
Full name
dr. E. Stouthamer Contact details
Willem C. van Unnikgebouw

Heidelberglaan 2
Room ZON 108
3584 CS  UTRECHT
The Netherlands


Phone number (direct) +31 30 253 5772
Phone number (department) +31 30 253 2749
Gegenereerd op 2017-09-26 16:48:37
Last updated 30.09.2016