Chair
Quantitative Methods of Empirical Research in the Humanities
Date of appointment 01.08.2016
Inaugural lecture date 13.03.2017
Profile

Prof.dr. Hugo Quené is professor in Quantitative Methods of Empirical Research in the Humanities. He is a member of the Dept of Languages, Literature and Communication. His research focuses on the methodology of empirical research, and on the production and perception of spoken words and sentences. Quené teaches in courses on spoken language, research methodology and data analysis. Since 2014 he is director of undergraduate studies at the Undergraduate School of Languages, Literature and Communication.

Involved in the following study programme(s)
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More information and documents are available at http://uu.academia.edu/HugoQuene

Key publications

Bosker, Hans Rutger, Quené, H, Sanders, Ted & de Jong, Nivja H. (2014). The Perception of Fluency in Native and Nonnative Speech. Language Learning, 64 (3), (pp. 579-614).

Quené, H. (2013). Longitudinal trends in speech tempo: The case of Queen Beatrix. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 133 (6), (pp. EL452-EL457) (6 p.).

Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H. (2013). Parallels between self-monitoring for speech errors and identification of the misspoken segments. Journal of Memory and Language, 69 (3), (pp. 417-428) (12 p.).

Quené, H., Semin, G.R. & Foroni, F.M.G.M. (2012). Audible smiles and frowns affect speech comprehension. Speech Communication, 54 (7), (pp. 917-922) (6 p.). Highlights ► Smiles and frowns may interfere with speech production and comprehension. ► Speech synthesis of words with positive and with negative meaning. ► Formants shifted up or down to simulate smiling and frowning. ► Incongruent smiling or frowning impedes speech comprehension. ► Interference due to motor mimicry of smiling and frowning gestures. Keywords: Smiles; Speech comprehension; Emotion; Affect perception.

Quené, H. (2008). Multilevel modeling of between-speaker and within-speaker variation in spontaneous speech tempo. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 123 (2), (pp. 1104-1113) (10 p.).

Quené, H. & van den Bergh, H. (2008). Examples of mixed-effects modeling with crossed random effects and with binomial data. Journal of Memory and Language, 59 (4), (pp. 413-425) (13 p.).

All publications
  2015 - Articles
Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H (2015). Word onsets and speech errors - Explaining relative frequencies of segmental substitutions. Journal of Memory and Language, 78, (pp. 33-46) (14 p.).
  2014 - Book parts / chapters
Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H (2014). Do speakers try to distract attention from their speech errors? The prosody of self-repairs. In Johanneke Caspers, Yiya Chen, Willemijn Heeren, Jos Pacilly, Niels O. Schiller & Ellen van Zanten (Eds.), Above and Beyond the Segments - Experimental linguistics and phonetics (pp. 203) (217 p.). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Quené, H (2014). Longitudinal trends in pause distributions in spoken text. In René Kager, J. Grijzenhout & Koen Sebregts (Eds.), Where the Principles Fail - A Festschrift for Wim Zonneveld on the occasion of his 64th birthday (pp. 185-192). Utrecht: UiL OTS.
  2014 - Articles
Ferguson, S.H. & Quené, H. (2014). Acoustic correlates of vowel intelligibility in clear and conversational speech for young normal-hearing and elderly hearing-impaired listeners. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 135 (6), (pp. 3570-3584) (15 p.).
Bosker, H.R., Quené, H., Sanders, T.J.M. & de Jong, N.H. (2014). Native ‘um’s elicit prediction of low-frequency referents, but non-native ‘um’s do not. Journal of Memory and Language, 75, (pp. 104-116) (13 p.).
Pinget, A.C.H., Bosker, H.R., Quené, H. & de Jong, N.H. (2014). Native Speakers’ Perceptions of Fluency and Accent in L2 Speech. Language Testing, 31 (3), (pp. 349-365) (17 p.).
Bosker, Hans Rutger, Quené, H, Sanders, Ted & de Jong, Nivja H. (2014). The Perception of Fluency in Native and Nonnative Speech. Language Learning, 64 (3), (pp. 579-614).
  2013 - Articles
Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H. (2013). Heft Lemisphere: Exchanges predominate in segmental speech errors. Journal of Memory and Language, 68 (1), (pp. 26-38) (13 p.). Highlights: ► Overt segmental exchanges are often less frequent than anticipations and perseverations. ► It is hypothesized that in inner speech exchanges are more frequent. ► This hypothesis is tested experimentally and confirmed. ► It is concluded that exchanges are more often filtered out by self-monitoring. ► Response times suggest that segments in inner speech can be ambiguous between correct and erroneous. Keywords: Speech errors; Speech planning; Self-monitoring; Inner speech; Scan-copier.
Quené, H. (2013). Longitudinal trends in speech tempo: The case of Queen Beatrix. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 133 (6), (pp. EL452-EL457) (6 p.).
Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H. (2013). Parallels between self-monitoring for speech errors and identification of the misspoken segments. Journal of Memory and Language, 69 (3), (pp. 417-428) (12 p.).
van den Doel, W.Z. & Quené, H. (2013). The endonormative standards of European English: Emerging or elusive?. English World-Wide, 34 (1), (pp. 77-98) (22 p.).
Bosker, H.R., Pinget, A.C.H., Quené, H., Sanders, T.J.M. & de Jong, N.H. (2013). What makes speech sound fluent? The contributions of pauses, speed and repairs. Language Testing, 30 (2), (pp. 159-175) (17 p.).
  2012 - Articles
Quené, H., Semin, G.R. & Foroni, F.M.G.M. (2012). Audible smiles and frowns affect speech comprehension. Speech Communication, 54 (7), (pp. 917-922) (6 p.). Highlights ► Smiles and frowns may interfere with speech production and comprehension. ► Speech synthesis of words with positive and with negative meaning. ► Formants shifted up or down to simulate smiling and frowning. ► Incongruent smiling or frowning impedes speech comprehension. ► Interference due to motor mimicry of smiling and frowning gestures. Keywords: Smiles; Speech comprehension; Emotion; Affect perception.
  2011 - Books
Zonneveld, W., Quené, H. & Heeren, W.F.L. (2011). Sound and Sounds, Studies presented to M.E.H. (Bert) Schouten on the occasion of his 65th birthday. (210 p.). Utrecht: UiL OTS.
  2011 - Articles
Dejonckere, P, Quené, H., Smit, J., Duijnstee, M., Wijnen, F.N.K. & Gerrits, E. (2011). De Utrechtse opleidingskolom Logopedie. Logopedie en foniatrie, 83 (1), (pp. 1-4) (4 p.).
  2010 - Book parts / chapters
Quené, H. (2010). How to design and analyze language acquisition studies. In E. Blom & S. Unsworth (Eds.), Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research (pp. 269-284) (16 p.). Amsterdam: Benjamins.
  2010 - Articles
Persoon, I., Sanders, T.J.M., Quené, H. & Verhagen, A. (2010). Een coördinerende omdat-constructie in gesproken Nederlands? Tekstlinguïstische en prosodische aspecten. Nederlandse taalkunde (15), (pp. 259-282) (24 p.).
Quené, H. & Delft, L.E. (2010). Non-native durational patterns decrease speech intelligibility. Speech Communication, 52 (11-12), (pp. 911-918) (9 p.).
  2009 - Articles
den Ouden, H. & Quené, H. (2009). Effects of tempo in radio commercials on young and elderly listeners. Proceedings of Interspeech, (pp. 816-819).
de Bruijn, M.J., van den Bosch, L., Kuik, D.J., Quené, H., Langendijk, J.A., Leemans, C.R. & Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M. (2009). Objective acoustic-phonetic speech analysis in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 61 (3), (pp. 180-187) (8 p.).
Schreuder, M., Gilbers, D. & Quené, H. (2009). Recursion in phonology. Lingua, 119, (pp. 1243-1252) (10 p.).
  2008 - Articles
Quené, H. (2008). Andante of allegro? Verschillen in spreektempo tussen Vlamingen en Nederlanders. Onze taal, 77 (6), (pp. 179-181) (3 p.).
Quené, H. & van den Bergh, H. (2008). Examples of mixed-effects modeling with crossed random effects and with binomial data. Journal of Memory and Language, 59 (4), (pp. 413-425) (13 p.).
Quené, H. (2008). Multilevel modeling of between-speaker and within-speaker variation in spontaneous speech tempo. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 123 (2), (pp. 1104-1113) (10 p.).
van Rossum, M.A., Quené, H. & Nooteboom, S.G. (2008). Prosodic boundaries in alaryngeal speech. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 22 (3), (pp. 215-231) (17 p.).
Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H. (2008). Self-monitoring and feedback - A new attempt to find the main cause of lexical bias in phonological speech errors. Journal of Memory and Language, 58, (pp. 837-861) (24 p.).
Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H. (2008). Self-monitoring versus feedback: A new attempt to find the main cause of lexical bias in phonological speech errors. Journal of Memory and Language, 58 (3), (pp. 837-861) (25 p.).
  2007 - Book parts / chapters
Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H. (2007). The SLIP Technique as a window on the Mental Preparation of Speech: Some Methodological Considerations. In M.J. Solé, P.S. Beddor & M. Ohala (Eds.), Experimental Approaches to Phonology. (pp. 339-350) (12 p.). Oxford University Press.
  2007 - Articles
Quené, H. (2007). On the just noticeable difference for tempo in speech. Journal of Phonetics, 35 (3), (pp. 353-362) (10 p.).
  2006 - Articles
Janse, E., Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H. (2006). Coping with gradient forms of /t/-deletion and lexical ambiguity in spoken word recognition. Language and Cognitive Processes, 22 (2), (pp. 161-200) (40 p.).
  2005 - Book parts / chapters
Quené, H. (2005). Spraakklanken en regels. In P.M. van Nieuwenhuijsen (Eds.), Het verschijnsel taal: Een kennismaking (pp. 22-36) (15 p.). Bussum: Coutinho, 2e, herziene druk.
  2005 - Articles
Quené, H. & Port, R.F. (2005). Effects of timing regularity and metrical expectancy on spoken-word perception. Phonetica, 62 (1), (pp. 1-13) (13 p.).
  2004 - Books
Quené, H. & van Heuven, V.J. (2004). On Speech and Language: Studies for Sieb G. Nooteboom. Utrecht: Netherlands Graduate School of Linguistics.
  2004 - Articles
Quené, H. & van den Bergh, H. (2004). On Multi-Level Modeling of data from repeated measures designs: A tutorial. Speech Communication, 43 (1-2), (pp. 103-121) (19 p.).
Quené, H. (2004). On the just-noticeable difference for tempo in speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 115 (5), (pp. 2607-2607) (1 p.).
  2003 - Articles
Quené, H. (08.05.2003). Letterendocenten overbelast. U blad : Utrechts universiteitsblad, (pp. 1/4).
Janse, E., Nooteboom, S.G. & Quené, H. (2003). Word-level intelligibility of time-compressed speech: Prosodic and segmental factors. Speech Communication, 41 (2-3), (pp. 287-301) (15 p.).
  2002 - Articles
Quené, H. (2002). Nederland geen Lake Wobegon. Exchange Affairs, 12.
Nooteboom, S.G., van Rossum, M.A., de Krom, G. & Quené, H. (2002). 'Pitch' accent in alaryngeal speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 45, (pp. 1106-1118) (13 p.).
  1998 - Book parts / chapters
Quené, H., van Rossum, M.A. & van Wijck, M. (1998). Assimilation and Anticipation in Word Perception. Proceedings of International congress of spoken language processing, Sydney, december 1st - 4th (cd rom) Rundle Mall: Causal productions, South Australia.
te Riele, S.M.M. & Quené, H. (1998). Evidence for early effects of sentence context on word segmentation. Proceedings 5th International conference on Spoken Language Processing 98 (cd-rom) Rundle Mall: Causal productions, South Australia.
  1998 - Articles
Quené, H. & Koster, M. (1998). Metrical Segmentation in Dutch: Vowel Quality or Stress?. Language and Speech, 41 (2), (pp. 185-202) (18 p.).
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Completed projects

Project:
UCU Accent Project 01.08.2010 to 31.07.2017
General project description



When people from native and non-native backgrounds come to- gether, and all speakers use English as a lingua franca, then how do their English accents change over time?


Do native speakers drift away from their native pronunci- ation standards? Do non-native speakers become more native-like, and does interference from their L1 decrease over time? Is the speaker’s accent of English related to their intelligibility and subjective accentedness? The English-language international Liberal Arts and Sciences College, University College Utrecht (UCU) in the Netherlands, provides an interesting envi- ronment to investigate such questions.


This project sees us collect speech data from about 250 undergraduate students over the three year period of their undergraduate degree. The students come from four different cohorts, and are recorded at five moments during spanning their time at college. They represent over 30 language backgrounds, with 60% being Dutch.  


Management of the corpus, annotation, segmentation and preparation of metadata for making this corpus public is the first focus of this work. The recordings will be made freely available to the academic community via the Max Planck Institute in Nijmegen. 





A core hypothesis in this project is that the native and non-native accents of UCU students will gradually converge to a single common international variety of English, which we call UCU English accent. This has implications, both social and linguistic, for the speech of this student group.


Further, we look at changes in intelligibility, speaker characteristics, intonation patterns, articulation behaviour and lexical usage. A social network analysis will also help to understand who is influenced by whom in terms of speech and accent behaviour.

 
Role Researcher Funding
Utrecht University
Project members UU
External project members:
  • dr. Rosemary Orr; Project leader and researcher
  • dr. Borja Martinovic
Project:
UCU Accent Project 01.08.2010 to 01.07.2017
General project description



When people from native and non-native backgrounds come to- gether, and all speakers use English as a lingua franca, then how do their English accents change over time?


Do native speakers drift away from their native pronunciation standards? Do non-native speakers become more native-like, and does interference from their L1 decrease over time? Is the speaker’s accent of English related to their intelligibil- ity and subjective accentedness? The English-language inter- national Liberal Arts and Sciences College, University College Utrecht (UCU) in the Netherlands, provides an interesting environment to investigate such questions.





This project sees us collect six years worth of data, tracking the accent development of upwards of 250 students over their three-year undergraduate period in an international honours Liberal Arts and Sciences campus.  


The corpus itself will contain around 750 hours of speech, including spoken texts of varying styles, spontaneous monologues and some dialogue, in both the L1 and L2 of the speakers.  The speech data will be made freely available to the academic community via the Max Planck Institute in Nijmegen.





A core hypothesis in this project is that the native and non-native accents of UCU students will gradually converge to a single common international variety of English, which we call UCU English accent. This has implications, both social and linguistic, for the speech of this student group, and this has been a subject of investigation for us since 2010. 


Other areas of interest to us are the change in intelligibility of the speaker over time, change in speaker characteristics and the effect on a speaker model for recognition, and accent/lexical differences between cohorts. 




 
Role Researcher Funding
Utrecht University
Project members UU
External project members:
  • Rosemary Orr; Project leader and researcher
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Currently prof. dr. Hugo Quené teaches the following course(s):
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Additional functions and activities

teacher at RINO Groep Utrecht

guest teacher

consultant on research methods and data analysis

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Full name
prof. dr. H. Quené Contact details
Transcomplex

Trans 10
Room 1.43
3512 JK  UTRECHT
The Netherlands


Phone number (direct) +31 30 253 6070
E-mail
H.Quene@uu.nl
Postal address
Trans 10
3512 JK    UTRECHT
The Netherlands
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Last updated 19.08.2017