Prof. dr. Karl Kuegle

Emeritus
Muziekwetenschap
k.b.j.kuegle@uu.nl
Afgesloten projecten
Project
Sound Memories: The Musical Past in Late-Medieval and Early-Modern Europe (SoundMe) 01-07-2016 tot 01-10-2019
Algemene projectbeschrijving

The SoundMe project investigates the genesis and early development of the concept of ‘music of the past’ in 13th-century Paris associated with newly invented technologies of writing musical time. It also traces the deliberate deployment of older music in the service of various political and religious agendas across Europe in a series of case studies ranging chronologically from the 14th to the 16th century. The project’s scholars are supported in their efforts by Associate Partners who will be available for experimental performance-based forms of research at various moments in the project. The ensembles will also be instrumental in disseminating the research to the general public. For further information, please go to www.soundme.eu or watch the project video channel on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCc5vmAcyYYEHCj4smJGkNQA

Rol
Onderzoeksleider
Financiering
2e geldstroom - overig HERA Joint Research Project 'Uses of the Past'
Overige projectleden
  • Dr. Ulrike Hascher-Burger (Utrecht University)
  • Dr. Frieda van der Heijden (Utrecht University)
  • Manon Louviot (Utrecht University)
  • Dr. Ruxandra Marinescu (Utrecht University)
  • Prof. Dr. Susan Rankin (University of Cambridge)
  • Adam Mathias (University of Cambridge)
  • Dr. Lenka Hlavkova (Charles University Prague)
  • Dr. David Eben (Charles University Prague)
  • Dr. Jan Ciglbauer (Charles University Prague)
  • Dr. Pawel Gancarczyk (Polish Academy of Sciences Warsaw)
  • Dr. Antonio Chemotti (Polish Academy of Sciences Warsaw)
  • Bartlomiej Gembicki (Polish Academy of Sciences Warsaw)
  • Prof. Dr. Inga Mai Groote (University of Zurich)
  • Christine Roth (University of Zurich)
  • Anonymous 3 (Cambridge)
  • Ensemble Bastarda (Warsaw)
  • Ensemble La Morra (Basel)
  • Ensemble Trigon (Leiden)
  • Scholar Gregoriana Pragensis (Prague)
  • Soundspace/Spacesound (Prague)
Project
Controlling Space, Disciplining Voice: The Congregation of Windesheim and Fifteenth-Century Monastic Reform in Northern Germany and the Low Countries 01-07-2016 tot 31-08-2019
Rol
Promotor
Individuele projectbeschrijving

This dissertation offers new insights into the ways in which a highly centralised organisation at the end of Middle Ages, the Congregation of Windesheim, implemented its ideals concerning liturgical and spiritual practices.

The study first examines the Windesheim regulations in detail. Religious women did not have equal say in managing their monasteries compared to their male counterparts. However, this inequality was not so much established to lessen women’s authority, but to accommodate their perceived weaker nature, so as to enable religious women to maximise their virtue and thereby reach salvation on behalf of everyone on Earth.

In a next step, the dissertation investigates the use of space in the Windesheim context. It focuses on processions, a practice strictly regulated in female monasteries following the Windesheim regulations. Even though the physical act of processing was prohibited, in Windesheim spirituality, the singing of the processional chants was seen as the crucial element in actualising the processional liturgy.  This challenges established views according to which space is inevitably the most central element in processing.

Finally, the author demonstrates that the concern for good singing in Windesheim monasteries is replete with spiritual and political agendas. This invites us to reconsider conventional readings of texts describing the quality of monastic voices in late-medieval sources. Combined with a discussion on the highly codified vision of space developed by the Congregation of Windesheim, the rich material on singing voices presented in Controlling Space, Disciplining Voice deepens our knowledge of the place of music in medieval societies.

Financiering
2e geldstroom - NWO HERA Uses of the Past - Sound Memories (soundme.eu)
Projectleden
Project
Music and Late Medieval European Court Cultures (MALMECC) 02-01-2016 tot 01-07-2022
Algemene projectbeschrijving

Late medieval European court cultures have traditionally been studied from a mono-disciplinary and national(ist) perspective. This focus has obscured much of the interplay of cultural performances that informed “courtly life”. Recent research has begun to reverse this, focusing on issues such as the tensions between orality, writing, and performance; the sociocultural dimensions of making and owning manuscripts (musical and otherwise); the interstices between musical, literary and visual texts and political, social and religious rituals; and the impact of gender, kinship, and social status on the genesis and transmission of culture and music. These “new medievalist” studies have significantly enhanced our understanding of the cultural meanings of singing, listening, and sound in late medieval times. Taking a decisive step further, MALMECC, for the first time, systematically explores late medieval (c. 1280-1450) court cultures and their music synoptically across Europe. England, the Low Countries, Avignon, Bohemia, south-eastern Germany/Salzburg, Savoy, Iberia, and Cyprus have been selected for study as each was a vibrant site of cultural production but has been relatively neglected due to prevailing discursive formations favouring “centres” like Paris and Florence. Linking these courts in a large-scale comparative study focused on the role of music in courtly life but embedded within a multidisciplinary framework encompassing all the arts as well as politics and religion reveals the complex ecology of late medieval performances of noblesse in unheard-of depth while at the same time throwing the unique qualities of each court into distinct relief. The project applies an innovative research paradigm that develops a trans-disciplinary and post-national(ist), “relational” approach to the study of music in late-medieval court cultures. In doing so it integrates all late medieval arts and re-constitutes the fullness of their potential meanings. For further information, please visit the project website: malmecc.eu

Rol
Onderzoeksleider
Financiering
3e geldstroom - EU ERC Advanced Grant
Overige projectleden
  • Martha Buckley (Project Manager)
  • University of Oxford
  • 2016-19
  • Dr. David Catalunya (Post-doctoral Researcher)
  • University of Oxford
  • 2019-22
  • Dr. Christophe Masson (Post-doctoral Researcher)
  • University of Oxford
  • 2017-19; currently Chercheur qualifié du FNRS at Université de Liège
  • Dr. Grantley McDonald (Post-doctoral Researcher)
  • University of Oxford
  • 2019-21
  • Dr. David Murray (Post-doctoral Researcher)
  • University of Oxford
  • 2016-19; currently Post-doctoral Researcher at Utrecht University
  • Claire Selby (Programme Manager)
  • University of Oxford
  • 2019-22
  • Dr. Laura Slater (Post-doctoral Researcher)
  • University of Oxford
  • 2016-19; currently Lecturer in the History of Medieval Art and Fellow of Peterhouse at University of Cambridge
  • Dr. Uri Smilansky (Post-doctoral Researcher)
  • University of Oxford
  • 2019-22
Project
Sporen van Tollius: Leven en werken van de Amersfoortse musicus Joannes Tollius (ca. 1555 – ca. 1620) 01-10-2014 tot 30-06-2017
Algemene projectbeschrijving

This dissertation investigates the life and works of the Amersfoort musician Joannes Tollius (ca. 1555 - ca. 1620) and the impact of the Reformation on music life in the Low Countries.

Rol
Promotor
Financiering
1e geldstroom
Overige projectleden
  • Simon Groot
Project
Late medieval and early modern court cultures: Towards an audiovisual, spatial and socio-economic semiotics of the arts in a pre-Enlightenment framework 01-01-2014 tot 31-03-2014
Algemene projectbeschrijving

A series of six exploratory research seminars.

Rol
Uitvoerder & contactpersoon
Financiering
1e geldstroom Strategic Theme Institutions Seed Money Competition (September 2013)
Project
Late medieval court culture in the northern Low Countries: Visualizing, interpreting, and contextualizing music fragments 01-09-2013 tot 18-05-2018
Algemene projectbeschrijving

The northern Low Countries in the later Middle Ages were ruled by important noble families who contributed considerably to the political, social, and cultural exchanges across Europe at the time. Sharing social and cultural practices as well as family ties with the top echelon of European aristocracy including the rulers of France, England, and the Empire, they maintained a lively cultural scene in Holland, too. In my research project, I will focus on a specific moment in the cultural environment of the courts in the northern Low Countries, the second half of the long fourteenth century (c. 1350-1420), taking into consideration secular and sacred music, visual art, as well as poetic and narrative texts. In doing so, a group of parchment fragments kept at the university libraries of Amsterdam, Leiden, and Utrecht which bears witness to significant musical activity in the northern Low Countries in the later Middle Ages will take central stage. The variety of genres and their multilingualism (French, Middle Dutch, and Latin texts) point to a lively cultural activity at a court in the Dutch-speaking region of Europe, making the court of Holland at The Hague a prime candidate for the provenance of the fragments. Despite occasional research on the music and its context, the fragment complex and the cultural landscape of the fourteenth and early fifteenth century in which the music was developed, performed, and distributed have not yet been subject to any comprehensive study by musicologists. This research project will be the first to study the full scope of music and texts contained in the fragments by way of newest philological, digital, and archival research techniques, thereby (re-)assessing their likely provenance and date as well as their cultural background on a transnational scale. This will provide important new information about the cultural dynamics at work in both the northern Low Countries and late medieval Europe, and for the first time ever fully chart and highlight the important musical heritage of the northern Low Countries in the decades before and around 1400.

Rol
Promotor
Financiering
2e geldstroom - NWO
Overige projectleden
  • Eliane Fankhauser M.A.
Project
Music/ology: A Baradian Account 01-09-2013 tot 11-01-2020
Rol
Promotor
Individuele projectbeschrijving

Muziek is een uitvoeringskunst en bestaat in en door de uitvoering. Muziek is daarmee geen ding maar een dynamiek van gebeurtenissen die met elkaar verbonden zijn.

Mijn centrale vraag is hoe wij, musicologen, zo’n samenstel van gebeurtenissen in voortdurende wording kunnen bestuderen. Om inzicht te krijgen in de reikwijdte van deze vraag laat ik me in de eerste plaats leiden door het probleem dat Harvard musicoloog Carolyn Abbate in 2004 opwerpt in haar essay “Music—Drastic or Gnostic?” Abbate wijst erop dat de musicoloog de dynamische werkelijkheid van de uitvoering (“drastic”) niet in gedachten en taal kan vatten (“gnostic”), omdat hij of zij niet tegelijkertijd aanwezig kan zijn bij de uitvoering én het proces van de uitvoering en alles wat daarmee gepaard gaat kan conceptualiseren.

Om een mogelijke oplossing voor Abbate’s probleem te zoeken lees ik haar argumentatie samen met de inzichten van natuurkundige en feministisch theoreticus Karen Barad. Barad gaat uit van de inherente verbondenheid van materie en betekenis waar alles onlosmakelijk deel is van de dynamische wording van de wereld. Haar idee is dat alles in en door gebeurtenissen ontstaat die zij “intra-acties” noemt—een permanent dynamisch relateren waardoor en waarbinnen alle zijnsvormen, met inbegrip van “ons”, ontstaan met al hun specifieke eigenschappen. Barad nodigt dus uit om de muziekuitvoering niet te bestuderen in termen van voorgegeven vaste elementen en structuren maar om de dynamiek te bestuderen van een voortdurende serie van intra-acties waaruit specifieke muziek en kennis ontstaan.

Financiering
Anders
Projectleden
Project
The Impact of Sound Recording on Persian Musical Culture, 1900-1960 01-01-2010 tot 01-01-2014
Algemene projectbeschrijving

The process of recording music introduced profound changes into music culture in general that musicology is only beginning to address systematically in recent years; in the case of Persia, recording, among other elements, influenced instruments, musical forms, performing styles and the social life of musicians. It is clear at present, at least to a certain extent, where and when recordings were made (generating a full bibliographical record remains work-in-progress), and we know that the venues of music-making changed dramatically in those years (for example, coffeehouses came to use record players instead of having live musicians play). What is required now is to clarify how the formative influence exerted by the recording process spread from the recording studio to the music (repertoire, instruments, style), the musicians (their social position, ranking, gender), and to society (venues, tastes) through the increased use of mechanically reproducible music. Thus, it may be argued that the recording process was a turning point in the evolution of Persian musical culture, at least certainly in urban settings.

Rol
Promotor
Financiering
1e geldstroom OGC PhD International Scholarship
Overige projectleden
  • Dr. Eckhard Neubauer
  • Prof. Anthony Seeger
Project
De kunst van de misleiding en de Franse lais in de 'Roman de Fauvel', handschrift Bibliotheque nationale de France, fonds français 146 01-09-2007 tot 31-08-2010
Algemene projectbeschrijving

The interpolated version of the French allegorical satire, the Roman de Fauvel, transmitted in manuscript Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, fonds français 146 (produced in Paris ca. 1317), targets the corruption within the French royal court in the last years of the rule of King Philip IV of France (r. 1285–1314) and during the troubled succession that followed in 1315 and 1316. It does so by telling the story of the lustful and evil horse Fauvel, who becomes king of France at the will of Fortune. Its unique music collection received a prominent position in musicology for decades as the most important musical repertoire of early fourteenth-century France. However, the four French lais that this source contains have attracted scarce scholarly attention although they represent the only surviving examples from the early fourteenth century of this highly complex musical and poetic form. Previous scholarship considered these songs as nothing more than a transitional stage in the history of the lyric lai with music, which starts with the troubadours and the trouvères and culminates in the oeuvre of Guillaume de Machaut (ca. 1300–1377). Contrary to this view, this dissertation argues that the lais in the Roman de Fauvel not only are extremely sophisticated, but also play a fundamental role, previously unrecognized, in the design of the Roman de Fauvel.

Part One (chapters 1 and 2) examines the multi-layered relationships between the four lais as a group and the text, music, and images in Book II of the Roman de Fauvel. These chapters show how the lais appear at key moments in the plot. Of all four lais, the first and the last come across as the most impressive and intricate monophonic compositions in the entire manuscript. 

Part Two consists of three chapters designed as case studies. Chapter 3 interprets the key narrative section describing Fauvel and his excessively decorated palace. Fauvel’s palace is presented as a symbolic space displaying the triumph of deceit. Among the wall decorations, songs about fraud are notated with “false” (chromatically inflected) music. This textual detail is carefully realized in the first lai (Talant que j’ai d’obeir) discussed in chapter 4. Performed by Fauvel himself in his first attempt to impress Fortune to accept his marriage proposal, this composition is exceptional in the way it undermines Fauvel’s declaration of love by means of a pyrotechnical accumulation of textual and musical effects. Chapter 5 analyzes the final lai in the story, the Lay des Hellequines. This lai debates the merits of love and advocates temperance and loyalty. Challenging the earlier interpretation that this composition serves only as a lyric suspension in the plot, chapter 5 argues that the debate conceals an important political message directed to the newly crowned Philip V and his wife at the time when dynastic continuity was in grave danger. This view is supported by the unusual use of the lofty dodecasyllable (alexandrine), which was typical for didactic texts.

 

Rol
Promotor
Financiering
1e geldstroom OGC PhD International Scholarship
Projectleden
Project
Digital Scores and Pre-Modern Textualities: The CMME Project 01-09-2006 tot 01-09-2009
Algemene projectbeschrijving

The CMME Project represents a systematized plan to introduce modern computing capabilities into the study of medieval and Renaissance music. Structured around a web-based public interface and software suite, the CMME will offer the first high-quality digital publication system for early music. The ""dynamic"" editions of the CMME move beyond the physical limitations of traditional printed editions in numerous aspects: they can be configured visually by individual users to offer different styles of transcription; automated searching, indexing, and statistical analysis can be performed on the musical data with unprecedented elegance and ease; publication errors can be corrected immediately. Conceptually, the CMME integrates current ideas about pre-modern textualities: the numerous variant versions typical of pre-modern music are no longer reduced to a single authorial text - an unavoidable necessity imposed by the format of a traditional, printed edition.

Rol
Onderzoeksleider
Financiering
2e geldstroom - NWO