Courses

Below, you will find an overview of courses from the current academic year of this Master's. This overview is meant to give you an idea of what to expect. The course offer may change in the coming academic year.

For this programme you can choose between three tracks. The courses of the tracks are described below. Some of the courses listed in period 2 are optional (elective) courses. See the Study Programme for more information.

Period 1, YEP and PID tracks

Youth, Education and Society 01: Paradigms & Practices

This course in the YES Master's program discusses the main perspectives and strategies that are useful for studying the field of youth, education and society, with a focus on youth care and youth policies. The course offers theoretical perspectives (paradigms) and practical strategies (practices) for studying social educational issues and learning to conduct analyses within the triangle of scientific research, policy, and practice. In this course, a paradigm is defined as a theoretical perspective, a set of coherent ideas or a philosophy of education that helps us to understand the field and informs our professional actions in it. Awareness of and understanding paradigms and understanding the consequences for applying them in practice are key aspects of the course.

The course consists of sessions that are divided into two parts. In part I (the lecture), a paradigm is introduced, which is discussed and practiced in part II (the seminar). The paradigms that are central to this course, are: Community Psychology, Critical Pedagogy and Theories of Social Governance. Each session focuses on the assigned reading for that week. The literature selected for this course will provide you with the theoretical knowledge you need to understand and contribute to current questions and debates in the field of youth, education and society.

In this course, students are assessed on an individual test which is a written exam (100%).

Youth, Education and Society 02: Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity

The focus of the course is the question how the development of youth and children can be optimized when working cross-culturally from a scientific, professional and policy perspective.
Within this general theme, we address themes as health, care and education and work as interrelated but separate subthemes. We study programmatic and policy attempts to improve the living circumstances and educational environments of youth, and analyse the scientific bases that underlies these. International development takes a central position in the course, next to other situations in which cultural knowledge is transferred cross-culturally, such as in situations of migration. Special target groups, such as child soldiers, street children, children with disabilities or children affected by AIDS will be addressed, while also paying attention to the situation of immigrant children and youth in welfare countries.

A key theme in the course is cultural diversity and the understanding of cultural diversity in the context of knowledge transfer between communities that are geographically or culturally far apart. How can we transfer knowledge that was constituted and formed in a Western setting and make it work in a non-Western setting? What should be the position of that (Western) knowledge in an increasingly culturally diverse world? How can this knowledge transfer be understood from the perspective of globalization, especially given the contact with other regions in the world? In this course you learn to think and act as a scientist and a professional when dealing with or working with scientific knowledge, intervention programs and policies, in (inter)national contexts that are culturally diverse.
You will examine Western ideas on international development, as well as the need to reshape these ideas. You will consider how local differences between the lives of young people in the Western world and the non-Western world, for example, determine their opportunities, developmental prospects and limitations. In this process, you will learn how to think from multiple perspectives. For example, more instrumental and technological approaches are contrasted with more critical views on international collaboration.

On this course, you will learn to take position in guided discussion groups, and write a position paper.

If you do the PID track, this course will be coupled with the course YES08 Practical. In this case you will gain practical experience with applying scientific knowledge in designing an intervention in an international development setting.

Youth, Education and Society 05: Academic Professional

The Academic Professional year-long course integrates the various course components in the Youth, Education, and Society Master’s curriculum. The underlying aim of this is to shape students into academic professionals – critical thinkers who can move smoothly between theory and practice and apply the latest knowledge and basic skills to identify, evaluate and resolve problems in social contexts. The professional field is actively involved in shaping this programme. Students can apply the knowledge, attitudes and skills they learn through various types of learning activities in assignments relating to the professional field of their choice.

Ethics and job market orientation are essential aspects of the Academic Professional course.

Ethics (1 EC, 28 hours) covers both academic and professional integrity and focuses on critically examining professionals' ethical behaviour in research and educational practices; critically assessing and discussing academic sources; developing academic curiosity; collaborating with stakeholders and taking account of their interests; sharing knowledge; maintaining professional networks; taking part in peer reviews; dealing with conflicting interests of organisations; exhibiting academic integrity as laid down in the Netherlands Code of Conduct for Research |ntegrity 2018; gaining an understanding of and being able to reflect on the development of your own professional identity; and being able to realise this by developing your own competencies as relevant to the needs of the job market. The faculty offers a course on academic integrity and ethics, comprising a lectures programme. The department offers Masterclasses correspond closely to topical debats on relevant subjects and policy areas in the field of Developmental Aid, Youth Care and Education. The programme invites experts (Youth, Education and Society lecturers, internship supervisors, alumni and/or specialists) from the professional field to share their practical experience with students – a glimpse of the work of an expert in the field and encourage students to think about professional integrity and talk about topical and ethical issues / cases from the expert's professional field.

Job market orientation (1.5 EC, 42 hours) concentrates primarily on your professional identity, forming a view on who you are as a professional and being able to articulate this, orally or in writing, and taking your first active steps onto the job market. Students also explore the Association of Educationalists in the Netherlands [NVO, 2017] basic educationalist professional profile, as well as their own affinity with it and their motivation for pursuing it. Lectures and scheduled meetings are, in principle, compulsory for all Youth, Education and Society students, but there is room for individual choices in the job market orientation component (eight hours). Examples of these options include Youth, Education and Society excursions, visits to a research or educational conference, or a lecture.

Students attend lectures concerning Juveniles and Law (1 EC, 28 hours) in order to meet the NVO's entry requirements after completing the Master’s programme. You will complete the year-long course with an individual reflection dossier (1.5 EC, 42 hours), primarily dedicated to reflecting on your own professional development. You will write a brief report about your study activities, including a reflection on the relevance and applicability of your internship, thesis and future professional profile (no more than four pages, excluding title sheet and appendices). The final version of your reflection dossier will be assessed by the internship supervisor using an assessment form.

Youth, Education and Society 08: Practical

In this practical you will gain practical experience with applying scientific knowledge in a group assignment such as designing or evaluating an intervention, as related to a particular field, depending on your track. The field is thus different for different students and might be either the field of youth care, international development or inclusive education.

You will work in small groups and will attend feedback sessions with your fellow students and instructor. During these feedback sessions, you will get the chance to work on your group assignment, ask questions, and receive feedback from your fellow students and instructor.

The assignment is carried out by a group of max five students and is concluded with a collective paper and a short presentation during the last session.

Period 1, EFIS track

Youth, Education and Society 01: Paradigms & Practices

This course in the YES Master's program discusses the main perspectives and strategies that are useful for studying the field of youth, education and society, with a focus on youth care and youth policies. The course offers theoretical perspectives (paradigms) and practical strategies (practices) for studying social educational issues and learning to conduct analyses within the triangle of scientific research, policy, and practice. In this course, a paradigm is defined as a theoretical perspective, a set of coherent ideas or a philosophy of education that helps us to understand the field and informs our professional actions in it. Awareness of and understanding paradigms and understanding the consequences for applying them in practice are key aspects of the course.

The course consists of sessions that are divided into two parts. In part I (the lecture), a paradigm is introduced, which is discussed and practiced in part II (the seminar). The paradigms that are central to this course, are: Community Psychology, Critical Pedagogy and Theories of Social Governance. Each session focuses on the assigned reading for that week. The literature selected for this course will provide you with the theoretical knowledge you need to understand and contribute to current questions and debates in the field of youth, education and society.

In this course, students are assessed on an individual test which is a written exam (100%).

Youth, Education and Society 11: Perspectives on Cultural Diversity and Social Inclusion in Education

The course addresses the increasing tension and polarization between different ethno-cultural groups in schools and classrooms as well as how these operate in other domains or institutions relevant for the socialization of youth such as the family, the neighborhood, youth clubs or mosques.

It deals with issues of ethnic and social conflict and inequality on the one hand, and methodologies for inclusion and finding common ground, overcoming problematic aspects difference on the other.
Perspectives and methodologies inclusion, equity, democratic citizenship and social justice will play an important part in the course.

Students gain theoretical insights, analytical tools and learn about hands on methodologies that are relevant for educational settings, youth care, youth welfare, related support services and policy work.

The course pays attention to the analyses of diversity and divergence/polarization, inequality and social justice at a variety of scales: from how diversity operates in small scale micro educational processes in classrooms to how it is addressed in larger scale politics of diversity in democratic societies and the role of education therein. From what the effects of systems and infrastructures are on inequality in education and care to how inequality can be represented in micro-learning settings such as in learning contexts for literacy, numeracy and multi-lingualism.

Students will learn about facts and figures, theories, models of understanding of (the construction of) difference, in-group, out-group mechanisms, polarization (including radicalization), inequality, disadvantage, stigma and discrimination as well as about theories and models of inclusion, recognition, emancipation of minorities, multiculturalism, overcoming difference, and democratic citizenship as applied to schools, families and neighborhoods and related services and policies.

Students learn about methodologies and interventions to analyze and optimize concrete practices and issues, such as inter-ethnic learning situations, conflict and diversity management, school identity issues, quality measures in early childhood education for minorities, and/or family and neighborhood based interventions such as parenting programs for minorities.

In line with the YES program, the course teaches students about the policy context of the aforementioned issues, and students are stimulated to contribute to and form their opinion about on public debates on the afore mentioned issues in a critically reflective way both in the national and in the international context. Students learn to become reflective of their own normative positions in these matters.

The course offers a series of (guest)lectures, an interactive seminar in which the literature is discussed and students practice with forming their opinion and normative positions.

The YES11 course is designed in contrast and as complementary to the YES12 course, and has a focus on processes of in- and exclusion that not only involves schools and classrooms, but also other spaces relevant for the formation of youth such as the family, the community, the neighbourhood, the (workings of) educational system more broadly and other infrastructures relevant for youth at a local or national level.

In case you do the EFIS track this course will be coupled with the course YES08 Practical. In this case you will gain practical experience with applying scientific knowledge in designing and or evaluating an intervention in an educational setting related to the issues dealt with in the YES11 course.

Youth, Education and Society 08: Practical

In this practical you will gain practical experience with applying scientific knowledge in a group assignment such as designing or evaluating an intervention, as related to a particular field, depending on your track. The field is thus different for different students and might be either the field of youth care, international development or inclusive education.

You will work in small groups and will attend feedback sessions with your fellow students and instructor. During these feedback sessions, you will get the chance to work on your group assignment, ask questions, and receive feedback from your fellow students and instructor.

The assignment is carried out by a group of max five students and is concluded with a collective paper and a short presentation during the last session.

Youth, Education and Society 05: Academic Professional

The Academic Professional year-long course integrates the various course components in the Youth, Education, and Society Master’s curriculum. The underlying aim of this is to shape students into academic professionals – critical thinkers who can move smoothly between theory and practice and apply the latest knowledge and basic skills to identify, evaluate and resolve problems in social contexts. The professional field is actively involved in shaping this programme. Students can apply the knowledge, attitudes and skills they learn through various types of learning activities in assignments relating to the professional field of their choice.

Ethics and job market orientation are essential aspects of the Academic Professional course.

Ethics (1 EC, 28 hours) covers both academic and professional integrity and focuses on critically examining professionals' ethical behaviour in research and educational practices; critically assessing and discussing academic sources; developing academic curiosity; collaborating with stakeholders and taking account of their interests; sharing knowledge; maintaining professional networks; taking part in peer reviews; dealing with conflicting interests of organisations; exhibiting academic integrity as laid down in the Netherlands Code of Conduct for Research |ntegrity 2018; gaining an understanding of and being able to reflect on the development of your own professional identity; and being able to realise this by developing your own competencies as relevant to the needs of the job market. The faculty offers a course on academic integrity and ethics, comprising a lectures programme. The department offers Masterclasses correspond closely to topical debats on relevant subjects and policy areas in the field of Developmental Aid, Youth Care and Education. The programme invites experts (Youth, Education and Society lecturers, internship supervisors, alumni and/or specialists) from the professional field to share their practical experience with students – a glimpse of the work of an expert in the field and encourage students to think about professional integrity and talk about topical and ethical issues / cases from the expert's professional field.

Job market orientation (1.5 EC, 42 hours) concentrates primarily on your professional identity, forming a view on who you are as a professional and being able to articulate this, orally or in writing, and taking your first active steps onto the job market. Students also explore the Association of Educationalists in the Netherlands [NVO, 2017] basic educationalist professional profile, as well as their own affinity with it and their motivation for pursuing it. Lectures and scheduled meetings are, in principle, compulsory for all Youth, Education and Society students, but there is room for individual choices in the job market orientation component (eight hours). Examples of these options include Youth, Education and Society excursions, visits to a research or educational conference, or a lecture.

Students attend lectures concerning Juveniles and Law (1 EC, 28 hours) in order to meet the NVO's entry requirements after completing the Master’s programme. You will complete the year-long course with an individual reflection dossier (1.5 EC, 42 hours), primarily dedicated to reflecting on your own professional development. You will write a brief report about your study activities, including a reflection on the relevance and applicability of your internship, thesis and future professional profile (no more than four pages, excluding title sheet and appendices). The final version of your reflection dossier will be assessed by the internship supervisor using an assessment form.

Period 2, YEP and PID tracks

Youth, Education and Society 03: Prevention 3.0: Perspectives & Design

This course deals with the question of how educational, community and psychological perspectives on prevention, and empirical knowledge can be integrated in a new prevention framework; Prevention 3.0. To that end, we will examine a range of historic perspectives on prevention. Students will learn to apply these approaches to social youth policies or perspectives on prevention. The approaches will be relevant in diverse cultural and legislative settings.

Prevention 1.0: focuses on developing academic perspectives and empirical knowledge of prevention strategies, based on classic ‘prevention science’ – an academic field with its own conceptual framework (i.e., at-risk model) and empirical knowledge base. We will also consider evidence-based preventive interventions.

Prevention 2.0: primarily concentrates on demedicalisation and alleviating burdens, promoting well-being instead of reducing risks, emphasizing the 'strengths of the individual', positive psychology, and the importance of the ‘pedagogic civil society' (De Winter, 2011). A significant addition here is collaboration between family members, volunteers and professionals (i.e., needs assessment).

Prevention 3.0: The Prevention 1.0 and 2.0 perspectives each have their own strengths and weaknesses. Therefore, the challenge is to link both perspectives to each other and to develop preventive interventions, supported by the academic empirical knowledge gained in Prevention 1.0, within a specific social/cultural and legislative context and by taking into account the basic principles examined in Prevention 2.0.

This course deals with a new approach to supporting, helping and caring for young people and families based on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC, 1990). According to the UNCRC “Every child must be able to grow up healthily and in safety, develop their talents, and participate in society to the best of their ability”. Parents have primary responsibility in this, with relevant authorities coming into action if the parents are unable to meet this responsibility.
The legislative context of the UNCRC requires professionals who can work on developing an pedagogical infrastructure in line with these goals, and who can develop and evaluate appropriate new preventive interventions.

In this course, you will learn how to apply the perspectives of Prevention 1.0 and Prevention 2.0 to a currently relevant societal youth issue in the field of prevention, as well as how to combine different perspectives on prevention.

In sum, this course is about the targeted prevention of problem behavior (e.g., aggression, depression), of social problems (e.g., dropping out of school, delinquency), and risk behavior (e.g., substance abuse, unhealthy behavior) and the encouragement of a healthy lifestyle. Scientifically proven methods for identifying risks, parenting support and preventive interventions are available for this. However, many youth problems emanate from the way in which society has organized care for and the approach towards children and young people. For example, what facilities are arranged by local authorities to help children develop talents, how are young people involved in their local living environments, how do you promote integration, and what is being done about exclusion? These kinds of issues are influenced by youth policies which need to be taken into account when developing innovative interventions from a Prevention 3.0 perspective.

With the help of scientific literature, policy memoranda, and a series of 8 lectures, this course offers an in-depth examination of the options for prevention and how they are organized in different countries. In an assignment, students apply this knowledge into the design of an innovative preventive intervention for a concrete currently relevant youth issue.

Youth, Education and Society 05: Academic Professional

The Academic Professional year-long course integrates the various course components in the Youth, Education, and Society Master’s curriculum. The underlying aim of this is to shape students into academic professionals – critical thinkers who can move smoothly between theory and practice and apply the latest knowledge and basic skills to identify, evaluate and resolve problems in social contexts. The professional field is actively involved in shaping this programme. Students can apply the knowledge, attitudes and skills they learn through various types of learning activities in assignments relating to the professional field of their choice.

Ethics and job market orientation are essential aspects of the Academic Professional course.

Ethics (1 EC, 28 hours) covers both academic and professional integrity and focuses on critically examining professionals' ethical behaviour in research and educational practices; critically assessing and discussing academic sources; developing academic curiosity; collaborating with stakeholders and taking account of their interests; sharing knowledge; maintaining professional networks; taking part in peer reviews; dealing with conflicting interests of organisations; exhibiting academic integrity as laid down in the Netherlands Code of Conduct for Research |ntegrity 2018; gaining an understanding of and being able to reflect on the development of your own professional identity; and being able to realise this by developing your own competencies as relevant to the needs of the job market. The faculty offers a course on academic integrity and ethics, comprising a lectures programme. The department offers Masterclasses correspond closely to topical debats on relevant subjects and policy areas in the field of Developmental Aid, Youth Care and Education. The programme invites experts (Youth, Education and Society lecturers, internship supervisors, alumni and/or specialists) from the professional field to share their practical experience with students – a glimpse of the work of an expert in the field and encourage students to think about professional integrity and talk about topical and ethical issues / cases from the expert's professional field.

Job market orientation (1.5 EC, 42 hours) concentrates primarily on your professional identity, forming a view on who you are as a professional and being able to articulate this, orally or in writing, and taking your first active steps onto the job market. Students also explore the Association of Educationalists in the Netherlands [NVO, 2017] basic educationalist professional profile, as well as their own affinity with it and their motivation for pursuing it. Lectures and scheduled meetings are, in principle, compulsory for all Youth, Education and Society students, but there is room for individual choices in the job market orientation component (eight hours). Examples of these options include Youth, Education and Society excursions, visits to a research or educational conference, or a lecture.

Students attend lectures concerning Juveniles and Law (1 EC, 28 hours) in order to meet the NVO's entry requirements after completing the Master’s programme. You will complete the year-long course with an individual reflection dossier (1.5 EC, 42 hours), primarily dedicated to reflecting on your own professional development. You will write a brief report about your study activities, including a reflection on the relevance and applicability of your internship, thesis and future professional profile (no more than four pages, excluding title sheet and appendices). The final version of your reflection dossier will be assessed by the internship supervisor using an assessment form.

Elective course

You can choose from the elective courses offered by the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences or choose a course that fits your interests from another faculty or university.

Period 2, EFIS track

Youth, Education and Society 12: Dealing with Cultural Diversity in Education

Promoting social inclusion in culturally diverse educational settings is a goal shared by many schools and universities, but actually achieving this goal in the day-to-day classroom is often hard to do. The goal of this teaching module is to highlight a few of the key challenges and concerns in promoting social inclusion in cultural diverse classrooms and schools and illustrate ways to incorporate an understanding of cultural diversity in the classroom and beyond. Within this general theme, we address themes such as, intercultural communication, civic education, polarization, radicalization, epistemic cultures, punitive approaches and student marginalization as interrelated, but separate subthemes. Next, it teaches and allows students to gain practice with designing and evaluating methodologies and interventions to analyze and optimize inter-cultural learning situations, conflict and diversity management, school identity issues etc. We study and analyze scientific literature addressing different subthemes and based on the literature we will propose practical recommendations for schools and teachers. We will focus on mainly international literature and will translate these to the Dutch context. A key theme in the course is combination between literature and practice. We will work with realistic case studies based on everyday experiences of teachers. An important goal of this course is to become aware of your own epistemological and normative position as a researcher and professional in the field of education. In this course you learn to think and act as an academic professional. You will learn to take position in guided discussion groups, and write a position paper. Furthermore, you will gain practical experience with applying scientific knowledge in designing an intervention in an intercultural setting.

Educational Design & Consultancy

In the course, students choose a specific theme and the working groups are divided according to these themes. The master Educational Sciences helps students to become broadly oriented educational scientists. For students educational sciences it is therefore obligatory to sign up for a theme that is different from the theme of the master thesis or the theme of the apprenticeship. Other students can choose freely from the themes. Thems that can be chosen are:

a. Instructional design
b. Assessment and evaluation
c. Learning in organisations
 
Every student incorporates the fourth theme d. Relevance for practice in his or her assignments.
 
Four activities are carried out in the working groups: discussing the online lectures, presenting, making an annotated library and working on the assignments (individual paper and TED talk). body { font-size: 9pt;

Youth, Education and Society 05: Academic Professional

The Academic Professional year-long course integrates the various course components in the Youth, Education, and Society Master’s curriculum. The underlying aim of this is to shape students into academic professionals – critical thinkers who can move smoothly between theory and practice and apply the latest knowledge and basic skills to identify, evaluate and resolve problems in social contexts. The professional field is actively involved in shaping this programme. Students can apply the knowledge, attitudes and skills they learn through various types of learning activities in assignments relating to the professional field of their choice.

Ethics and job market orientation are essential aspects of the Academic Professional course.

Ethics (1 EC, 28 hours) covers both academic and professional integrity and focuses on critically examining professionals' ethical behaviour in research and educational practices; critically assessing and discussing academic sources; developing academic curiosity; collaborating with stakeholders and taking account of their interests; sharing knowledge; maintaining professional networks; taking part in peer reviews; dealing with conflicting interests of organisations; exhibiting academic integrity as laid down in the Netherlands Code of Conduct for Research |ntegrity 2018; gaining an understanding of and being able to reflect on the development of your own professional identity; and being able to realise this by developing your own competencies as relevant to the needs of the job market. The faculty offers a course on academic integrity and ethics, comprising a lectures programme. The department offers Masterclasses correspond closely to topical debats on relevant subjects and policy areas in the field of Developmental Aid, Youth Care and Education. The programme invites experts (Youth, Education and Society lecturers, internship supervisors, alumni and/or specialists) from the professional field to share their practical experience with students – a glimpse of the work of an expert in the field and encourage students to think about professional integrity and talk about topical and ethical issues / cases from the expert's professional field.

Job market orientation (1.5 EC, 42 hours) concentrates primarily on your professional identity, forming a view on who you are as a professional and being able to articulate this, orally or in writing, and taking your first active steps onto the job market. Students also explore the Association of Educationalists in the Netherlands [NVO, 2017] basic educationalist professional profile, as well as their own affinity with it and their motivation for pursuing it. Lectures and scheduled meetings are, in principle, compulsory for all Youth, Education and Society students, but there is room for individual choices in the job market orientation component (eight hours). Examples of these options include Youth, Education and Society excursions, visits to a research or educational conference, or a lecture.

Students attend lectures concerning Juveniles and Law (1 EC, 28 hours) in order to meet the NVO's entry requirements after completing the Master’s programme. You will complete the year-long course with an individual reflection dossier (1.5 EC, 42 hours), primarily dedicated to reflecting on your own professional development. You will write a brief report about your study activities, including a reflection on the relevance and applicability of your internship, thesis and future professional profile (no more than four pages, excluding title sheet and appendices). The final version of your reflection dossier will be assessed by the internship supervisor using an assessment form.

Elective course

You can choose from the elective courses offered by the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences or choose a course that fits your interests from another faculty or university.

Period 3 and 4, YEP, PID and EFIS tracks

Youth, Education and Society 06: Internship

Each student will carry out an internship. The internship and thesis are closely linked in the programme, see under the course description of Youth, Education and Society 07: Thesis. The organization in which you do your internship and the issues with which it deals should be relevant to the field of the Youth, Education, and Society Master; this will be determined and approved by the internship coordinator. During the internship, you will gain practical experience at an institute or organization related to one of the programme's angles of approach. You could gain experience, for example, as a researcher, policy maker or project manager. Youth, Education and Society students do internships in a range of settings, including such organizations as:

• local authorities (municipalities) or ministries (government);
• national or regional knowledge institutes (research and policy);
• university research projects (research);
• umbrella, representative or quality assurance organisations of social services ;
• the research and development department of a large youth organisation or juvenile care organization (quality assurance policy);
• research or consultancy organisation (applied research);
• sports institutes or sport-related knowledge institutes;
• NGOs (Pedagogical International Development track);
• International institutes and centres (Pedagogical International Development track).

Youth, Education and Society students conduct their internships from February until July (blocks 3 and 4). It is also possible to do your internship at an organization outside the Netherlands, in this case the same applies for your research in most cases. Applications for internships are submitted during block 1. In block 2, students prepare for their internships under the supervision of a teacher. The online Youth, Education and Society internship database on Blackboard is available for students wishing to explore the options for doing an internship before the start of the academic year. Information will be available on our website. Students apply for an internship in one of the following three tracks:
• Youth Policy, Education and Prevention (YEP);
• Pedagogical International Development (PID);
* Education for Inclusive Societies (EFIS).

Youth Policy, Education and Prevention is our ‘regular’ track, while Pedagogical International Development has a specific focus on International Development (see for Education for Inclusive Societies below). The main difference between these tracks is the kind of social issues you are addressing in your internship and thesis. Course work is largely similar, but students have the possibility in the assignments to focus on specific themes related to their track). Students in the regular track will mostly be working with social issues of Youth, Education and Society as related to moderns welfare states, while students who do our track Pedagogical International Development will focus on issues of Youth, Education and Society as related to International Development. For our regular track, we are working with National and local knowledge and policy organizations or research institutes, such as the Netherlands Youth Institute (NJI), the Verwey Jonker Institute, or the ministry of Education, culture and Science or the ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports. It is also possible to work with international organizations within this track.
For our track Pedagogical International Development, we are working with international partners involved in international aid, such as UNESCO, Oxfam Novib, Safe the Children or Edukans. In both tracks the possibility exists to do the internship outside of the Netherlands. Students have done their internships in both Africa, Latin America, Asia, as well as in Eastern Europe. While the programme offers internship options from our network, students might also bring in other organizations. For the track Education for Inclusive Societies we are working with a diversity of partners in the educational field. Students are invited to participate in innovative projects together with researchers, practitioners, and policy makers, in which new interventions, approaches are designed, researched, evaluated and re-designed.For this track, students also attend specific courses on the theme of their track that they follow together with students from Educational Sciences and the teacher education programme.

The purpose of an internship is to enable students to integrate their academic knowledge from the programme with practical skills. These skills will be advanced further by combining the internship with the course YES05: Youth, Education and Society: Academic Professional.

Youth, Education and Society 07: Thesis

The Master's thesis is the final assignment, in which students demonstrate their academic ability by carrying out independent scientific research in the field of Youth, Education & Society . Students will develop their ability:
• to carefully analyse socially-urgent issues in relation to the field of Youth, Education & Society , with the aid of the latest academic theories
• to independently collect and process empirical data;
• to deliver an accurate and accessible academic report on the subject.

In the Master’s programme Youth, Education and Society you learn to use theoretical approaches that acknowledge the complexity of the social issues, as is the case with, for example, ecological or contextual models. In general, research is focused on issues of innovation, improvement or critical evaluation of existing prevention strategies, interventions, youth policy, and/or theory approaches. Students can do their research project either in the Netherlands or in other countries.

The research conducted for the Master’s thesis will, in principle, be carried out within or in close collaboration with the organization in which you do your internship. The reason for this link is to ensure that students can practice how to respond to issues from practice, with the aid of independent academic analysis and methodologies. The most suitable research method will depend on the research question, which is formulated in consultation with the student, the internship organization, and the university supervisor.

A thesis might involve :
• a classic descriptive study or research that tests an hypothesis;
• a practical analysis in which the quality of a policy or an intervention is studied with a process evaluation and/or an effect study, based on scientific theories and research methods;
• a meta-analysis in which larger numbers of existing empirical studies are examined and compared;
• a theoretical-analytical study in which a theoretical perspective itself is the subject of research.

Research projects are set up taking account of the various levels at which issues in the field of Youth, Education & Society can be influenced. In many cases, a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods (mixed methods) will be applied, depending on what is best applicable given the research questions and the time frame.

Youth, Education and Society 05: Academic Professional

The Academic Professional year-long course integrates the various course components in the Youth, Education, and Society Master’s curriculum. The underlying aim of this is to shape students into academic professionals – critical thinkers who can move smoothly between theory and practice and apply the latest knowledge and basic skills to identify, evaluate and resolve problems in social contexts. The professional field is actively involved in shaping this programme. Students can apply the knowledge, attitudes and skills they learn through various types of learning activities in assignments relating to the professional field of their choice.

Ethics and job market orientation are essential aspects of the Academic Professional course.

Ethics (1 EC, 28 hours) covers both academic and professional integrity and focuses on critically examining professionals' ethical behaviour in research and educational practices; critically assessing and discussing academic sources; developing academic curiosity; collaborating with stakeholders and taking account of their interests; sharing knowledge; maintaining professional networks; taking part in peer reviews; dealing with conflicting interests of organisations; exhibiting academic integrity as laid down in the Netherlands Code of Conduct for Research |ntegrity 2018; gaining an understanding of and being able to reflect on the development of your own professional identity; and being able to realise this by developing your own competencies as relevant to the needs of the job market. The faculty offers a course on academic integrity and ethics, comprising a lectures programme. The department offers Masterclasses correspond closely to topical debats on relevant subjects and policy areas in the field of Developmental Aid, Youth Care and Education. The programme invites experts (Youth, Education and Society lecturers, internship supervisors, alumni and/or specialists) from the professional field to share their practical experience with students – a glimpse of the work of an expert in the field and encourage students to think about professional integrity and talk about topical and ethical issues / cases from the expert's professional field.

Job market orientation (1.5 EC, 42 hours) concentrates primarily on your professional identity, forming a view on who you are as a professional and being able to articulate this, orally or in writing, and taking your first active steps onto the job market. Students also explore the Association of Educationalists in the Netherlands [NVO, 2017] basic educationalist professional profile, as well as their own affinity with it and their motivation for pursuing it. Lectures and scheduled meetings are, in principle, compulsory for all Youth, Education and Society students, but there is room for individual choices in the job market orientation component (eight hours). Examples of these options include Youth, Education and Society excursions, visits to a research or educational conference, or a lecture.

Students attend lectures concerning Juveniles and Law (1 EC, 28 hours) in order to meet the NVO's entry requirements after completing the Master’s programme. You will complete the year-long course with an individual reflection dossier (1.5 EC, 42 hours), primarily dedicated to reflecting on your own professional development. You will write a brief report about your study activities, including a reflection on the relevance and applicability of your internship, thesis and future professional profile (no more than four pages, excluding title sheet and appendices). The final version of your reflection dossier will be assessed by the internship supervisor using an assessment form.