Below, you will find an overview of courses from the current academic year of this Master's. This overview is meant to give you an idea of what to expect. The course offer may change in the coming academic year.

Period 1

Effective Mental Health Intervention for Youth

This course aims to increase insights in the development of, and ways to prevent or successfully treat psychopathology in children and adolescents. You will gather knowledge about the primary factors causing, increasing and maintaining psychopathology, learn how these factors can be determined by means of diagnostic assessment, and learn how to establish proper treatment recommendations. Scientific knowledge on (the effectiveness/efficacy of) preventive intervention and treatment will be increased. Furthermore, you will learn how to determine which intervention is most effective for a specific client, by looking at which intervention works, for whom, when and why. You will learn to implement your scientific knowledge in the daily practice of psychological care, and learn to reflect critically on those practices.

Introduction to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Youth

Lectures: will address stepwise 1) case conceptualisation, 2) from case conceptualisation to treatment planning, 3) from treatment planning to session planning, 4) from session planning to session evaluation, 5) from session evaluation to evaluation of the therapuetic process. Students will gain understanding of both the theoretical background of CBT, the empirical support for CBT, the use of CBT in common practice and CBT content and techniques.

Study of literature: students will be provided with literature that supports the objectives, fits both with the lectures as well as the assigments. Students will receive information on clinical strategies common in the Netherlands versus common in other Western countries.

Work groups: practice with clinical cases, practice with delivering CBT-techniques.

Homework assignments: the assignments prepare the student for the formal assignment at the end of the course.

Final assignment: at the end of the course the students submit their assignment, which includes sections on which students worked (step-wise) during the work groups.

Academic Professional Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

The focus of this course is on the professional development of students. Various topical issues that are relevant to professionalism, scientific research and practice in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology are addressed. These issues relate to broader themes that students will encounter during their internship and thesis, as well as in their future work as a professional in the domain of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.
Central themes for the course could include Ethics (how to recognize and reflect on ethical dilemmas in daily practice and to maintain professional and scientific integrity), Professionalism and Life long learning (how to keep your academic knowledge up to date and practice according to sound ethical principles and the state of the art scientific evidence base), Critical scientific thinking, Effective communication and Professional career development.
Issues will be addressed in interdisciplinary lectures (organized at the level of the Faculty of Social Sciences) that will provide both a theoretical orientation and an applied focus (i.e., providing students with examples from practice). Students are required to reflect critically on these topics and to consider the relevance of these issues for their own research work (in the context of their master's thesis) and practical work (in the context of their internship). Working groups, emphasizing reflecting on professional and personal skills, will be interactive in nature and require active participation of students.
Thematic lectures will be organized, relating to current issues in the field.

The course includes (1) lectures about ethics and scientific integrity, (2) activities helping students to prepare for professional practice and job search, (3) thematic lectures about current issues in the field of clinical child and adolescent psychology, (4) working groups emphasizing on reflection on professional and personal development as well as ethical conduct and integrity in professional practice.

Master's Thesis Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

The topic of the master’s thesis has to be within the domain of developmental psychology and needs to be linked to a theoretical framework. Most theses are conducted in the context of on-going research projects in the department. These projects focus on themes in the fields of normal as well as problematic development of children and adolescents in different social contexts (home, school, peer group). Research for the thesis may also be conducted outside of the university, in which case the supervisor will be from the organization where the research is performed, and a member of departmental staff will function as a second supervisor. Please refer to the course manual for regulations, themes and procedures.
The primary product and basis of grading of the master's thesis is the thesis itself. In principle, it should be written in English, but exceptions are considered, if based on good grounds. Second, the student needs to contribute to a symposium where all students present and defend their findings. A third criterion for grading concerns the research process, which will be monitored by the supervisor across the whole course of the research project.

Internship Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

Types of Internships
Internships are completed at institutions in which child and adolescent psychologists are active, at research institutions and at the university (limited availability).
We distinguish two types of internships:

1. Clinical/professional internship
In a clinical internship students are prepared to work as a developmental / child and adolescent psychologist. Students will acquire and practice professional skills and actively participate in diagnostic assessment (intake, apply instruments, score and interpret test results, report to clients), intervention, and coaching of children and adolescents with mental health, behavioural, or learning problems.
a. Clinical internships in an institution with Dutch speaking clients (20 EC)
These internships are only open to students who have an adequate proficiency in Dutch. This clinical internship will be most suitable for students who aspire to qualify for a job as a child and adolescent psychologist in a Dutch institution for children and adolescents with mental health, behavioural, or learning problems.
Within this internship, students gain competence in conducting diagnostic research according to the diagnostic cycle, as described by De Bruyn and colleagues (2006). Students are expected to proceed through the diagnostic cycle a number of times during the internship. If possible, they are also expected to devote a portion of their time to actively carrying out treatments (i.e. support, supervision and the discussion of assignments).
In principle, this internship can be arranged in such a way that it fulfils the requirements set by the NIP for the basic registration in psychodiagnostics (BAPD). The BAPD is not a required component of the Master's degree programme, however, and there is therefore no guarantee that it can be achieved. Students are expected to make time available outside the study programme to write the BAPD reports. Moreover, this internship prepares students to follow post-academic education in The Netherlands as a healthpsychologist, school psychologist and the registration process for NIP Child- and Youth Psychologist.
b. Clinical internships for foreign students (15 EC)
Students who don’t master the Dutch language (sufficiently) may do their internship in an institution which prepares them to work as a developmental / child and adolescent psychologist, and where professionals and clients speak a language the students sufficiently master, for example an institution in their home country.

2. Research, policy and/or innovation internship (15 EC)
This internship is intended for students who wish to familiarise themselves with research- , policy- or innovation related professional activities. Students will actively participate in an ongoing mental healthcare-related project at a (governmental) mental healthcare organisation or university (limited availability!). Students will develop competencies that relate to different phases of the empirical cycle, such as literature review, data collection, data analysis, reporting, and implementing research results.
 
Requirements for achieving the aforementioned objectives include the following:

  • Knowledge: of general social-scientific theories, of theories concerning normal and problematic development, of common therapeutic interventions, of theories concerning specific topics of research at the institution.
  • Basic skills: e.g. diagnostic skills, interview techniques, written and oral reporting, basic skills with regard to various types of treatments, methodological and statistical skills, and skills relating to the implementation of results.
  • The activities should be performed increasingly independently.

Note: Students who complete an internship of 15 EC have to attend an extra course (5 EC) in professional skills.
 
Kind of institutions
For example, within the area of mental healthcare, internships can take place in institutions for youth services, childcare centres (for children with mental impairments), hospitals and clinics for child and adolescent psychiatry. Internships within the area of education could include school advisory or guidance services, special education schools or national pedagogic centres. Institutions can be oriented towards the problems of individual children (as emerging through education), as well as towards the broader or systematic problems of groups of students and educational institutions as a whole. New possibilities include community teams in several municipalities. Research institutions are relevant within the area of policy and research. Examples include Trimbos and TNO, the research departments of external care institutions and departments within the university.
 
Procedure for finding an internship
Students are responsible for finding their own internship positions.
Internships typically start in September. Note: Internships abroad have to be scheduled in the second half of the Master's programme.
It is vital that you start looking for an internship position in time. Students are advised to send their letters of application for internships beginning in mid-January before the start of the Master’s programme. Students will not be allowed to apply for an internship unless they have received conditional admission to the Master’s programme (i.e. it must be clear that they will be able to complete their Bachelor’s degrees before the start of the new academic year). It is strongly recommended to register early for the Master’s programme.
Once students have been accepted as interns at specific institutions, they should contact the internship coordinator in order to arrange the further procedure. For each student, a formal internship contract is concluded between the department, the internship institution and the student. With regard to the substantive arrangement of the internship, the student writes an internship plan, which is submitted to the internship supervisor and the supervising lecturer within the department.
When searching for internships, students may use the department’s internship bank, which contains addresses at which other students have previously completed internships. Starting in early January, an overview of internship positions is posted to the internship directory.
Students can also search through websites and their own networks. Internships at institutions that are not included in the internship directory must be approved in advance by the programme’s internship coordinator. Students should therefore submit their internships in a timely manner, so that the internship supervisor can assess whether the internship meets the requirements of the programme (see ‘Important requirements’).
 
Important requirements concerning the internship:

  1. The institution offers an internship with a total duration of 420 hours (15 EC; Clinical internships for foreign students; Research, policy and/or innovation internship ) to 560 hours (20 EC; Clinical internships in an institution with Dutch speaking clients) to be completed within 6 months (i.e., three days per week).
  2. The internship must offer the opportunity to learn activities and skills suited to the activities of a child and adolescent psychologist.
  3. Internship students have to work under supervision of a behavioural scientist who works at the institution which offers the internship. Internship supervisors in a clinical setting should have a university degree in developmental or child /adolescent psychology or in “orthopedagogiek”. In a research/policy internship the supervisor is an experienced academic (preferably PhD) researcher within the organization (policy internship); at the university the supervisor is a PhD researcher or PhD candidate at the university.
  4. The supervisor has a working experience of three years or more.
  5. In addition to the internship supervisor, a supervising lecturer will be assigned to the intern. This lecturer has final responsibility for assigning the final mark.
  6. Fridays must be reserved for education at the university. Compulsory monthly internship supervision meetings are held parallel to the internship for the purpose of addressing internship-related topics.

Internship information
Information is available in documents on the stagebank. For more information, questions and check of suitbality of an internship students can contact the stagecoordinator at StagecoordinatieKJ@uu.nl
In November/December 2018, an internship information session will be held for students who are interested in the CCAP Master’s programme for 2019-2020. An invitation will be posted on Blackboard. Students who are not (or who are no longer) registered at Utrecht University are advised to contact the internship coordinator at StagecoordinatieKJ@uu.nl in order to have an invitation to the internship information session and the criteria for approving internship positions sent to them.
Various internship documents are posted on Blackboard: internship regulations, guidelines concerning the internship report, an example of an internship work plan, the assessment form, the internship contract and the working methods for the NIP basic registration (BAPD).

Period 2

Elective course

You can choose from the elective courses offered by the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences or choose a course that fits your interests from another faculty or university.

Introduction to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Youth

Lectures: will address stepwise 1) case conceptualisation, 2) from case conceptualisation to treatment planning, 3) from treatment planning to session planning, 4) from session planning to session evaluation, 5) from session evaluation to evaluation of the therapuetic process. Students will gain understanding of both the theoretical background of CBT, the empirical support for CBT, the use of CBT in common practice and CBT content and techniques.

Study of literature: students will be provided with literature that supports the objectives, fits both with the lectures as well as the assigments. Students will receive information on clinical strategies common in the Netherlands versus common in other Western countries.

Work groups: practice with clinical cases, practice with delivering CBT-techniques.

Homework assignments: the assignments prepare the student for the formal assignment at the end of the course.

Final assignment: at the end of the course the students submit their assignment, which includes sections on which students worked (step-wise) during the work groups.

Master's Thesis Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

The topic of the master’s thesis has to be within the domain of developmental psychology and needs to be linked to a theoretical framework. Most theses are conducted in the context of on-going research projects in the department. These projects focus on themes in the fields of normal as well as problematic development of children and adolescents in different social contexts (home, school, peer group). Research for the thesis may also be conducted outside of the university, in which case the supervisor will be from the organization where the research is performed, and a member of departmental staff will function as a second supervisor. Please refer to the course manual for regulations, themes and procedures.
The primary product and basis of grading of the master's thesis is the thesis itself. In principle, it should be written in English, but exceptions are considered, if based on good grounds. Second, the student needs to contribute to a symposium where all students present and defend their findings. A third criterion for grading concerns the research process, which will be monitored by the supervisor across the whole course of the research project.

Academic Professional Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

The focus of this course is on the professional development of students. Various topical issues that are relevant to professionalism, scientific research and practice in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology are addressed. These issues relate to broader themes that students will encounter during their internship and thesis, as well as in their future work as a professional in the domain of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.
Central themes for the course could include Ethics (how to recognize and reflect on ethical dilemmas in daily practice and to maintain professional and scientific integrity), Professionalism and Life long learning (how to keep your academic knowledge up to date and practice according to sound ethical principles and the state of the art scientific evidence base), Critical scientific thinking, Effective communication and Professional career development.
Issues will be addressed in interdisciplinary lectures (organized at the level of the Faculty of Social Sciences) that will provide both a theoretical orientation and an applied focus (i.e., providing students with examples from practice). Students are required to reflect critically on these topics and to consider the relevance of these issues for their own research work (in the context of their master's thesis) and practical work (in the context of their internship). Working groups, emphasizing reflecting on professional and personal skills, will be interactive in nature and require active participation of students.
Thematic lectures will be organized, relating to current issues in the field.

The course includes (1) lectures about ethics and scientific integrity, (2) activities helping students to prepare for professional practice and job search, (3) thematic lectures about current issues in the field of clinical child and adolescent psychology, (4) working groups emphasizing on reflection on professional and personal development as well as ethical conduct and integrity in professional practice.

Internship Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

Types of Internships
Internships are completed at institutions in which child and adolescent psychologists are active, at research institutions and at the university (limited availability).
We distinguish two types of internships:

1. Clinical/professional internship
In a clinical internship students are prepared to work as a developmental / child and adolescent psychologist. Students will acquire and practice professional skills and actively participate in diagnostic assessment (intake, apply instruments, score and interpret test results, report to clients), intervention, and coaching of children and adolescents with mental health, behavioural, or learning problems.
a. Clinical internships in an institution with Dutch speaking clients (20 EC)
These internships are only open to students who have an adequate proficiency in Dutch. This clinical internship will be most suitable for students who aspire to qualify for a job as a child and adolescent psychologist in a Dutch institution for children and adolescents with mental health, behavioural, or learning problems.
Within this internship, students gain competence in conducting diagnostic research according to the diagnostic cycle, as described by De Bruyn and colleagues (2006). Students are expected to proceed through the diagnostic cycle a number of times during the internship. If possible, they are also expected to devote a portion of their time to actively carrying out treatments (i.e. support, supervision and the discussion of assignments).
In principle, this internship can be arranged in such a way that it fulfils the requirements set by the NIP for the basic registration in psychodiagnostics (BAPD). The BAPD is not a required component of the Master's degree programme, however, and there is therefore no guarantee that it can be achieved. Students are expected to make time available outside the study programme to write the BAPD reports. Moreover, this internship prepares students to follow post-academic education in The Netherlands as a healthpsychologist, school psychologist and the registration process for NIP Child- and Youth Psychologist.
b. Clinical internships for foreign students (15 EC)
Students who don’t master the Dutch language (sufficiently) may do their internship in an institution which prepares them to work as a developmental / child and adolescent psychologist, and where professionals and clients speak a language the students sufficiently master, for example an institution in their home country.

2. Research, policy and/or innovation internship (15 EC)
This internship is intended for students who wish to familiarise themselves with research- , policy- or innovation related professional activities. Students will actively participate in an ongoing mental healthcare-related project at a (governmental) mental healthcare organisation or university (limited availability!). Students will develop competencies that relate to different phases of the empirical cycle, such as literature review, data collection, data analysis, reporting, and implementing research results.
 
Requirements for achieving the aforementioned objectives include the following:

  • Knowledge: of general social-scientific theories, of theories concerning normal and problematic development, of common therapeutic interventions, of theories concerning specific topics of research at the institution.
  • Basic skills: e.g. diagnostic skills, interview techniques, written and oral reporting, basic skills with regard to various types of treatments, methodological and statistical skills, and skills relating to the implementation of results.
  • The activities should be performed increasingly independently.

Note: Students who complete an internship of 15 EC have to attend an extra course (5 EC) in professional skills.
 
Kind of institutions
For example, within the area of mental healthcare, internships can take place in institutions for youth services, childcare centres (for children with mental impairments), hospitals and clinics for child and adolescent psychiatry. Internships within the area of education could include school advisory or guidance services, special education schools or national pedagogic centres. Institutions can be oriented towards the problems of individual children (as emerging through education), as well as towards the broader or systematic problems of groups of students and educational institutions as a whole. New possibilities include community teams in several municipalities. Research institutions are relevant within the area of policy and research. Examples include Trimbos and TNO, the research departments of external care institutions and departments within the university.
 
Procedure for finding an internship
Students are responsible for finding their own internship positions.
Internships typically start in September. Note: Internships abroad have to be scheduled in the second half of the Master's programme.
It is vital that you start looking for an internship position in time. Students are advised to send their letters of application for internships beginning in mid-January before the start of the Master’s programme. Students will not be allowed to apply for an internship unless they have received conditional admission to the Master’s programme (i.e. it must be clear that they will be able to complete their Bachelor’s degrees before the start of the new academic year). It is strongly recommended to register early for the Master’s programme.
Once students have been accepted as interns at specific institutions, they should contact the internship coordinator in order to arrange the further procedure. For each student, a formal internship contract is concluded between the department, the internship institution and the student. With regard to the substantive arrangement of the internship, the student writes an internship plan, which is submitted to the internship supervisor and the supervising lecturer within the department.
When searching for internships, students may use the department’s internship bank, which contains addresses at which other students have previously completed internships. Starting in early January, an overview of internship positions is posted to the internship directory.
Students can also search through websites and their own networks. Internships at institutions that are not included in the internship directory must be approved in advance by the programme’s internship coordinator. Students should therefore submit their internships in a timely manner, so that the internship supervisor can assess whether the internship meets the requirements of the programme (see ‘Important requirements’).
 
Important requirements concerning the internship:

  1. The institution offers an internship with a total duration of 420 hours (15 EC; Clinical internships for foreign students; Research, policy and/or innovation internship ) to 560 hours (20 EC; Clinical internships in an institution with Dutch speaking clients) to be completed within 6 months (i.e., three days per week).
  2. The internship must offer the opportunity to learn activities and skills suited to the activities of a child and adolescent psychologist.
  3. Internship students have to work under supervision of a behavioural scientist who works at the institution which offers the internship. Internship supervisors in a clinical setting should have a university degree in developmental or child /adolescent psychology or in “orthopedagogiek”. In a research/policy internship the supervisor is an experienced academic (preferably PhD) researcher within the organization (policy internship); at the university the supervisor is a PhD researcher or PhD candidate at the university.
  4. The supervisor has a working experience of three years or more.
  5. In addition to the internship supervisor, a supervising lecturer will be assigned to the intern. This lecturer has final responsibility for assigning the final mark.
  6. Fridays must be reserved for education at the university. Compulsory monthly internship supervision meetings are held parallel to the internship for the purpose of addressing internship-related topics.

Internship information
Information is available in documents on the stagebank. For more information, questions and check of suitbality of an internship students can contact the stagecoordinator at StagecoordinatieKJ@uu.nl
In November/December 2018, an internship information session will be held for students who are interested in the CCAP Master’s programme for 2019-2020. An invitation will be posted on Blackboard. Students who are not (or who are no longer) registered at Utrecht University are advised to contact the internship coordinator at StagecoordinatieKJ@uu.nl in order to have an invitation to the internship information session and the criteria for approving internship positions sent to them.
Various internship documents are posted on Blackboard: internship regulations, guidelines concerning the internship report, an example of an internship work plan, the assessment form, the internship contract and the working methods for the NIP basic registration (BAPD).

Period 3

Academic Professional Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

The focus of this course is on the professional development of students. Various topical issues that are relevant to professionalism, scientific research and practice in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology are addressed. These issues relate to broader themes that students will encounter during their internship and thesis, as well as in their future work as a professional in the domain of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.
Central themes for the course could include Ethics (how to recognize and reflect on ethical dilemmas in daily practice and to maintain professional and scientific integrity), Professionalism and Life long learning (how to keep your academic knowledge up to date and practice according to sound ethical principles and the state of the art scientific evidence base), Critical scientific thinking, Effective communication and Professional career development.
Issues will be addressed in interdisciplinary lectures (organized at the level of the Faculty of Social Sciences) that will provide both a theoretical orientation and an applied focus (i.e., providing students with examples from practice). Students are required to reflect critically on these topics and to consider the relevance of these issues for their own research work (in the context of their master's thesis) and practical work (in the context of their internship). Working groups, emphasizing reflecting on professional and personal skills, will be interactive in nature and require active participation of students.
Thematic lectures will be organized, relating to current issues in the field.

The course includes (1) lectures about ethics and scientific integrity, (2) activities helping students to prepare for professional practice and job search, (3) thematic lectures about current issues in the field of clinical child and adolescent psychology, (4) working groups emphasizing on reflection on professional and personal development as well as ethical conduct and integrity in professional practice.

Internship Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

Types of Internships
Internships are completed at institutions in which child and adolescent psychologists are active, at research institutions and at the university (limited availability).
We distinguish two types of internships:

1. Clinical/professional internship
In a clinical internship students are prepared to work as a developmental / child and adolescent psychologist. Students will acquire and practice professional skills and actively participate in diagnostic assessment (intake, apply instruments, score and interpret test results, report to clients), intervention, and coaching of children and adolescents with mental health, behavioural, or learning problems.
a. Clinical internships in an institution with Dutch speaking clients (20 EC)
These internships are only open to students who have an adequate proficiency in Dutch. This clinical internship will be most suitable for students who aspire to qualify for a job as a child and adolescent psychologist in a Dutch institution for children and adolescents with mental health, behavioural, or learning problems.
Within this internship, students gain competence in conducting diagnostic research according to the diagnostic cycle, as described by De Bruyn and colleagues (2006). Students are expected to proceed through the diagnostic cycle a number of times during the internship. If possible, they are also expected to devote a portion of their time to actively carrying out treatments (i.e. support, supervision and the discussion of assignments).
In principle, this internship can be arranged in such a way that it fulfils the requirements set by the NIP for the basic registration in psychodiagnostics (BAPD). The BAPD is not a required component of the Master's degree programme, however, and there is therefore no guarantee that it can be achieved. Students are expected to make time available outside the study programme to write the BAPD reports. Moreover, this internship prepares students to follow post-academic education in The Netherlands as a healthpsychologist, school psychologist and the registration process for NIP Child- and Youth Psychologist.
b. Clinical internships for foreign students (15 EC)
Students who don’t master the Dutch language (sufficiently) may do their internship in an institution which prepares them to work as a developmental / child and adolescent psychologist, and where professionals and clients speak a language the students sufficiently master, for example an institution in their home country.

2. Research, policy and/or innovation internship (15 EC)
This internship is intended for students who wish to familiarise themselves with research- , policy- or innovation related professional activities. Students will actively participate in an ongoing mental healthcare-related project at a (governmental) mental healthcare organisation or university (limited availability!). Students will develop competencies that relate to different phases of the empirical cycle, such as literature review, data collection, data analysis, reporting, and implementing research results.
 
Requirements for achieving the aforementioned objectives include the following:

  • Knowledge: of general social-scientific theories, of theories concerning normal and problematic development, of common therapeutic interventions, of theories concerning specific topics of research at the institution.
  • Basic skills: e.g. diagnostic skills, interview techniques, written and oral reporting, basic skills with regard to various types of treatments, methodological and statistical skills, and skills relating to the implementation of results.
  • The activities should be performed increasingly independently.

Note: Students who complete an internship of 15 EC have to attend an extra course (5 EC) in professional skills.
 
Kind of institutions
For example, within the area of mental healthcare, internships can take place in institutions for youth services, childcare centres (for children with mental impairments), hospitals and clinics for child and adolescent psychiatry. Internships within the area of education could include school advisory or guidance services, special education schools or national pedagogic centres. Institutions can be oriented towards the problems of individual children (as emerging through education), as well as towards the broader or systematic problems of groups of students and educational institutions as a whole. New possibilities include community teams in several municipalities. Research institutions are relevant within the area of policy and research. Examples include Trimbos and TNO, the research departments of external care institutions and departments within the university.
 
Procedure for finding an internship
Students are responsible for finding their own internship positions.
Internships typically start in September. Note: Internships abroad have to be scheduled in the second half of the Master's programme.
It is vital that you start looking for an internship position in time. Students are advised to send their letters of application for internships beginning in mid-January before the start of the Master’s programme. Students will not be allowed to apply for an internship unless they have received conditional admission to the Master’s programme (i.e. it must be clear that they will be able to complete their Bachelor’s degrees before the start of the new academic year). It is strongly recommended to register early for the Master’s programme.
Once students have been accepted as interns at specific institutions, they should contact the internship coordinator in order to arrange the further procedure. For each student, a formal internship contract is concluded between the department, the internship institution and the student. With regard to the substantive arrangement of the internship, the student writes an internship plan, which is submitted to the internship supervisor and the supervising lecturer within the department.
When searching for internships, students may use the department’s internship bank, which contains addresses at which other students have previously completed internships. Starting in early January, an overview of internship positions is posted to the internship directory.
Students can also search through websites and their own networks. Internships at institutions that are not included in the internship directory must be approved in advance by the programme’s internship coordinator. Students should therefore submit their internships in a timely manner, so that the internship supervisor can assess whether the internship meets the requirements of the programme (see ‘Important requirements’).
 
Important requirements concerning the internship:

  1. The institution offers an internship with a total duration of 420 hours (15 EC; Clinical internships for foreign students; Research, policy and/or innovation internship ) to 560 hours (20 EC; Clinical internships in an institution with Dutch speaking clients) to be completed within 6 months (i.e., three days per week).
  2. The internship must offer the opportunity to learn activities and skills suited to the activities of a child and adolescent psychologist.
  3. Internship students have to work under supervision of a behavioural scientist who works at the institution which offers the internship. Internship supervisors in a clinical setting should have a university degree in developmental or child /adolescent psychology or in “orthopedagogiek”. In a research/policy internship the supervisor is an experienced academic (preferably PhD) researcher within the organization (policy internship); at the university the supervisor is a PhD researcher or PhD candidate at the university.
  4. The supervisor has a working experience of three years or more.
  5. In addition to the internship supervisor, a supervising lecturer will be assigned to the intern. This lecturer has final responsibility for assigning the final mark.
  6. Fridays must be reserved for education at the university. Compulsory monthly internship supervision meetings are held parallel to the internship for the purpose of addressing internship-related topics.

Internship information
Information is available in documents on the stagebank. For more information, questions and check of suitbality of an internship students can contact the stagecoordinator at StagecoordinatieKJ@uu.nl
In November/December 2018, an internship information session will be held for students who are interested in the CCAP Master’s programme for 2019-2020. An invitation will be posted on Blackboard. Students who are not (or who are no longer) registered at Utrecht University are advised to contact the internship coordinator at StagecoordinatieKJ@uu.nl in order to have an invitation to the internship information session and the criteria for approving internship positions sent to them.
Various internship documents are posted on Blackboard: internship regulations, guidelines concerning the internship report, an example of an internship work plan, the assessment form, the internship contract and the working methods for the NIP basic registration (BAPD).

Master's Thesis Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

The topic of the master’s thesis has to be within the domain of developmental psychology and needs to be linked to a theoretical framework. Most theses are conducted in the context of on-going research projects in the department. These projects focus on themes in the fields of normal as well as problematic development of children and adolescents in different social contexts (home, school, peer group). Research for the thesis may also be conducted outside of the university, in which case the supervisor will be from the organization where the research is performed, and a member of departmental staff will function as a second supervisor. Please refer to the course manual for regulations, themes and procedures.
The primary product and basis of grading of the master's thesis is the thesis itself. In principle, it should be written in English, but exceptions are considered, if based on good grounds. Second, the student needs to contribute to a symposium where all students present and defend their findings. A third criterion for grading concerns the research process, which will be monitored by the supervisor across the whole course of the research project.

Period 4

Academic Professional Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

The focus of this course is on the professional development of students. Various topical issues that are relevant to professionalism, scientific research and practice in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology are addressed. These issues relate to broader themes that students will encounter during their internship and thesis, as well as in their future work as a professional in the domain of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.
Central themes for the course could include Ethics (how to recognize and reflect on ethical dilemmas in daily practice and to maintain professional and scientific integrity), Professionalism and Life long learning (how to keep your academic knowledge up to date and practice according to sound ethical principles and the state of the art scientific evidence base), Critical scientific thinking, Effective communication and Professional career development.
Issues will be addressed in interdisciplinary lectures (organized at the level of the Faculty of Social Sciences) that will provide both a theoretical orientation and an applied focus (i.e., providing students with examples from practice). Students are required to reflect critically on these topics and to consider the relevance of these issues for their own research work (in the context of their master's thesis) and practical work (in the context of their internship). Working groups, emphasizing reflecting on professional and personal skills, will be interactive in nature and require active participation of students.
Thematic lectures will be organized, relating to current issues in the field.

The course includes (1) lectures about ethics and scientific integrity, (2) activities helping students to prepare for professional practice and job search, (3) thematic lectures about current issues in the field of clinical child and adolescent psychology, (4) working groups emphasizing on reflection on professional and personal development as well as ethical conduct and integrity in professional practice.

Internship Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

Types of Internships
Internships are completed at institutions in which child and adolescent psychologists are active, at research institutions and at the university (limited availability).
We distinguish two types of internships:

1. Clinical/professional internship
In a clinical internship students are prepared to work as a developmental / child and adolescent psychologist. Students will acquire and practice professional skills and actively participate in diagnostic assessment (intake, apply instruments, score and interpret test results, report to clients), intervention, and coaching of children and adolescents with mental health, behavioural, or learning problems.
a. Clinical internships in an institution with Dutch speaking clients (20 EC)
These internships are only open to students who have an adequate proficiency in Dutch. This clinical internship will be most suitable for students who aspire to qualify for a job as a child and adolescent psychologist in a Dutch institution for children and adolescents with mental health, behavioural, or learning problems.
Within this internship, students gain competence in conducting diagnostic research according to the diagnostic cycle, as described by De Bruyn and colleagues (2006). Students are expected to proceed through the diagnostic cycle a number of times during the internship. If possible, they are also expected to devote a portion of their time to actively carrying out treatments (i.e. support, supervision and the discussion of assignments).
In principle, this internship can be arranged in such a way that it fulfils the requirements set by the NIP for the basic registration in psychodiagnostics (BAPD). The BAPD is not a required component of the Master's degree programme, however, and there is therefore no guarantee that it can be achieved. Students are expected to make time available outside the study programme to write the BAPD reports. Moreover, this internship prepares students to follow post-academic education in The Netherlands as a healthpsychologist, school psychologist and the registration process for NIP Child- and Youth Psychologist.
b. Clinical internships for foreign students (15 EC)
Students who don’t master the Dutch language (sufficiently) may do their internship in an institution which prepares them to work as a developmental / child and adolescent psychologist, and where professionals and clients speak a language the students sufficiently master, for example an institution in their home country.

2. Research, policy and/or innovation internship (15 EC)
This internship is intended for students who wish to familiarise themselves with research- , policy- or innovation related professional activities. Students will actively participate in an ongoing mental healthcare-related project at a (governmental) mental healthcare organisation or university (limited availability!). Students will develop competencies that relate to different phases of the empirical cycle, such as literature review, data collection, data analysis, reporting, and implementing research results.
 
Requirements for achieving the aforementioned objectives include the following:

  • Knowledge: of general social-scientific theories, of theories concerning normal and problematic development, of common therapeutic interventions, of theories concerning specific topics of research at the institution.
  • Basic skills: e.g. diagnostic skills, interview techniques, written and oral reporting, basic skills with regard to various types of treatments, methodological and statistical skills, and skills relating to the implementation of results.
  • The activities should be performed increasingly independently.

Note: Students who complete an internship of 15 EC have to attend an extra course (5 EC) in professional skills.
 
Kind of institutions
For example, within the area of mental healthcare, internships can take place in institutions for youth services, childcare centres (for children with mental impairments), hospitals and clinics for child and adolescent psychiatry. Internships within the area of education could include school advisory or guidance services, special education schools or national pedagogic centres. Institutions can be oriented towards the problems of individual children (as emerging through education), as well as towards the broader or systematic problems of groups of students and educational institutions as a whole. New possibilities include community teams in several municipalities. Research institutions are relevant within the area of policy and research. Examples include Trimbos and TNO, the research departments of external care institutions and departments within the university.
 
Procedure for finding an internship
Students are responsible for finding their own internship positions.
Internships typically start in September. Note: Internships abroad have to be scheduled in the second half of the Master's programme.
It is vital that you start looking for an internship position in time. Students are advised to send their letters of application for internships beginning in mid-January before the start of the Master’s programme. Students will not be allowed to apply for an internship unless they have received conditional admission to the Master’s programme (i.e. it must be clear that they will be able to complete their Bachelor’s degrees before the start of the new academic year). It is strongly recommended to register early for the Master’s programme.
Once students have been accepted as interns at specific institutions, they should contact the internship coordinator in order to arrange the further procedure. For each student, a formal internship contract is concluded between the department, the internship institution and the student. With regard to the substantive arrangement of the internship, the student writes an internship plan, which is submitted to the internship supervisor and the supervising lecturer within the department.
When searching for internships, students may use the department’s internship bank, which contains addresses at which other students have previously completed internships. Starting in early January, an overview of internship positions is posted to the internship directory.
Students can also search through websites and their own networks. Internships at institutions that are not included in the internship directory must be approved in advance by the programme’s internship coordinator. Students should therefore submit their internships in a timely manner, so that the internship supervisor can assess whether the internship meets the requirements of the programme (see ‘Important requirements’).
 
Important requirements concerning the internship:

  1. The institution offers an internship with a total duration of 420 hours (15 EC; Clinical internships for foreign students; Research, policy and/or innovation internship ) to 560 hours (20 EC; Clinical internships in an institution with Dutch speaking clients) to be completed within 6 months (i.e., three days per week).
  2. The internship must offer the opportunity to learn activities and skills suited to the activities of a child and adolescent psychologist.
  3. Internship students have to work under supervision of a behavioural scientist who works at the institution which offers the internship. Internship supervisors in a clinical setting should have a university degree in developmental or child /adolescent psychology or in “orthopedagogiek”. In a research/policy internship the supervisor is an experienced academic (preferably PhD) researcher within the organization (policy internship); at the university the supervisor is a PhD researcher or PhD candidate at the university.
  4. The supervisor has a working experience of three years or more.
  5. In addition to the internship supervisor, a supervising lecturer will be assigned to the intern. This lecturer has final responsibility for assigning the final mark.
  6. Fridays must be reserved for education at the university. Compulsory monthly internship supervision meetings are held parallel to the internship for the purpose of addressing internship-related topics.

Internship information
Information is available in documents on the stagebank. For more information, questions and check of suitbality of an internship students can contact the stagecoordinator at StagecoordinatieKJ@uu.nl
In November/December 2018, an internship information session will be held for students who are interested in the CCAP Master’s programme for 2019-2020. An invitation will be posted on Blackboard. Students who are not (or who are no longer) registered at Utrecht University are advised to contact the internship coordinator at StagecoordinatieKJ@uu.nl in order to have an invitation to the internship information session and the criteria for approving internship positions sent to them.
Various internship documents are posted on Blackboard: internship regulations, guidelines concerning the internship report, an example of an internship work plan, the assessment form, the internship contract and the working methods for the NIP basic registration (BAPD).

Master's Thesis Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

The topic of the master’s thesis has to be within the domain of developmental psychology and needs to be linked to a theoretical framework. Most theses are conducted in the context of on-going research projects in the department. These projects focus on themes in the fields of normal as well as problematic development of children and adolescents in different social contexts (home, school, peer group). Research for the thesis may also be conducted outside of the university, in which case the supervisor will be from the organization where the research is performed, and a member of departmental staff will function as a second supervisor. Please refer to the course manual for regulations, themes and procedures.
The primary product and basis of grading of the master's thesis is the thesis itself. In principle, it should be written in English, but exceptions are considered, if based on good grounds. Second, the student needs to contribute to a symposium where all students present and defend their findings. A third criterion for grading concerns the research process, which will be monitored by the supervisor across the whole course of the research project.