Webinar Week (17-21 October 2016)

Watch our Webinar!

On 18 October 2016 we organised a live webinar about the Master's programme Climate Physics. Our hosts Prof. Michiel van den Broeke and students André Jülling and Mark Dekker discussed the ins and outs of the programme and shared their experiences.

Did you miss the webinar? Don't worry, you can watch the recording here (select HD - 720p for high quality):

What did we cover?

  • Insights into the programme, courses and research areas
  • Student experiences with the programme and life as a student in Utrecht
  • Career prospects (PhD positions and careers outside academia)
  • Admission requirements and deadlines

Questions?

Don't hesitate to get in touch! For questions about the content of the programme or your eligibility you can contact the Programma Coordinator, Dr Willem Jan van de Berg (w.j.vandeberg@uu.nl). With questions about the application procedure you can contact our Student Desk (science.gsns@uu.nl).

About the hosts

Prof. Michiel van den Broeke
Professor Michiel van den Broeke

Michiel van den Broeke is professor of Polar Meteorology. Already at young age, he developed a deep fascination for nature's climate. "I was nine years old when the Netherlands had a very harsh winter. We could skate on the streets because of the frozen rain, and parts of the country shut down completely because of blizzards. I was fascinated to see how powerful nature can be and how we humans can do very little in the face of that power". His main research interest is to understand the past, present and future climate and mass balance of the large ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. "I perform my research at the Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht (IMAU) in the Ice and Climate research group. Our group combines experimental fieldwork (in situ meteorological experiments, automatic weather stations and surface mass balance observations) with regional climate models, the latter in close collaboration with the research department of the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI)".

André Jüling, PhD student
phd climate physics

André Jüling is a PhD student from Germany. He studied Physics and Mathematics in Berlin and Melbourne, where he found out about the IMAU Master's programme. “I have always been interested in our natural environment and wanted to apply my physics background to the issue of climate change". The breadth of topics offered in Utrecht fascinated him and during his Master's he gained a deep understanding of the climate system, its main processes, components and their interactions. On top of the various courses offered at IMAU, he also used the opportunity to take courses outside Utrecht University in places like the Dutch Wadden Sea or Svalbard in the high Arctic. After completing the Climate Physics Master's programme last year, André has just started his PhD in the Physical Oceanography group at the IMAU, working with state of the art climate models.

Mark Dekker, Master's student
Master's student Mark Dekker

Mark Dekker is a second year Master's student at IMAU. He holds a Bachelor's degree in both physics and mathematics. What makes the Master's programme Climate Physics ideal to him, was the combination of being scientific challenging (e.g. understanding atmospheric dynamics or internal waves), mathematical or computational challenging (e.g. making numerical simulations) and its societal relevance to the world around us. During his Bachelor's, he studied for half a year at Spitsbergen (Norway) and conducted a research internship at the KNMI on the structure of cyclones in the North Atlantic. During the Master's, he did several extra mathematics courses about mathematics in finance and on complex systems, to broaden his view. Within a few months, he will start his Master's thesis in Oceanography.