Activities

The Centre for the Humanities focuses its activities on the social impact of humanities research in the broadest sense of the word. As part of this, the CfH organises debates, workshops and lectures for both our own scientists and a wide audience.

See news and events for all (past) events of the Centre for the Humanities. Below a view examples of past events (see more in Dutch).

2018

In 2018 the CfH organised, among other things:

Public debate ‘Back to the Seventies’.

The Game with the Media, a discussion meeting for humanities scholars that reflected on performing in the media.

Public lecture Does religion still have a role in Dutch identity?, organised in collaboration with the Utrecht Religie Forum.

2017
Foto Robert Oosterbroek
Photo Robert Oosterbroek

Debate on Citizen Science

In early 2017, the first CfH debate on Citizen Science took place. Citizen Science is a relatively new yet rapidly growing way of practising science, in which researchers appeal to the public for their projects, asking them to contribute in ways varying from digitising archives to collecting street poetry. During the debate, Citizen Science was discussed, as well as the issues facing academics involved in such projects. Questions raised included what use Citizen Science has and what its pros and cons are. The debate began with a keynote address by Prof. Tine de Moor. She gave a general introduction on the opportunities that Citizen Science offers for humanities research and addressed some practical and ethical problems. In addition, five panellists reflected on Citizen Science from different perspectives. The debate was moderated by Prof. José van Dijck (Distinguished Professor).

Debate on Societal Impact of Humanities Research

In June 2017, the Centre for the Humanities organises a second debate night. Keynote speaker Prof. David Price, UCL Vice-Provost, talked about the Research Excellence Framework (REF) in the UK, in which the assessment of the social impact of research plays an important part. In addition, five panellists reflected on Citizen Science from different perspectives. The debate was moderated by Prof. Peter Schrijver (Vice Dean of the Faculty of Humanities).