PhD Defence: Hydrodynamics and suspended sediment dynamics in estuarine channel networks: an idealised modelling approach

PhD Defence of J. Wang MSc

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Many deltas contain multiple channels. In these channels, tidal flow and river flow interact with each other. Sediments on the bottom of channels are suspended by the current, and redistributed over the network of channels. The knowledge about water motion and sediment transport in these channel networks is important for both ecology and economy. However, they are sensitive to changing conditions due to both natural reasons and human activities. This thesis studies the responses of water motion and suspended sediment dynamics in coastal channel networks to changing conditions.

First, the dependences of water level, current, and river water transport on the changes in tides, river discharge, local geometric changes, and sea level rise in the Chinees Yangtze Estuary were analyzed and explained. This was achieved by developing an idealized process-based model that resolves the flow vertical structure.

Second, we studied how the net water transport is distributed over the channels, and how this distribution responses to above mentioned changes. Hereby, we showed the influence of salinity on the distribution of net water transport. 

Third, the suspended sediment dynamics in a simplified three-channel network were studied. We particularly focused on the responses of local maxima in the sediment concentration in different channels to channel dredging and constructions of dams and training walls.

Start date and time
End date and time
Location
Academiegebouw, Domplein 29
PhD candidate
J. Wang MSc
Dissertation
Hydrodynamics and suspended sediment dynamics in estuarine channel networks: an idealised modelling approach
PhD supervisor(s)
prof. dr. H.E. De Swart
Co-supervisor(s)
dr. Y. Dijkstra
More information
Full text via Utrecht University Repository