PhD defence: Diversity and connectivity of benthic meiofauna in ecosystems designated for deep-sea mining

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The deep sea, starting at 200 meters below the ocean's surface, constitutes the world's largest and least-explored biome, representing the last frontier on Earth. The deep sea encompasses a variety of ecosystems, that host unique and diverse communities and provide essential ecosystem functions and services. Three deep-sea ecosystems are known for their wealth in mineral resources, including hydrothermal vents with polymetallic sulphides, abyssal plains with polymetallic nodules, and sea mounts with ferromanganese crusts.

Humankind's increasing demand for mineral resources has led to the increased exploration of the deep sea. Commercial scale mining has not started, but test-mining operations have been conducted. Whilst mining the seabed carries significant environmental concerns, the current scientific knowledge is insufficient for the effective enviornmental management of deep-sea mining.

This thesis aims to close knowledge gaps with regard to biodiversity and connectivity of benthic meiofauna at deep-sea hydrothermal vents and at polymetallic nodule fields.

 

Start date and time
End date and time
Location
Utrecht University Hall, Domplein 29, and online via this link
PhD candidate
Coral Diaz-Recio Lorenzo
Dissertation
Diversity and connectivity of benthic meiofauna in ecosystems designated for deep-sea mining
PhD supervisor(s)
Prof. Dr Gert-Jan Reichart
Co-supervisor(s)
Dr Sabine Gollner