20 January 2020 from 16:15 to 17:00

PhD defence: Design of recharge and abstraction well systems in heterogeneous aquifers: modeling and experimental studies

For centuries, water wells have been used to access groundwater in the subsurface for recharge or production purposes. During the last decades, the use of wells for abstraction, recharge and storage of water in the subsurface is increased for a wide variety of applications. For some water well applications the hydraulic impact needs to be limited to a given depth or portion of the aquifer in order to optimise the entire efficiency of the well system. For such cases, partially-penetrating wells (PPWs) screened in the desired portion of the aquifer are beneficial, instead of fully-penetrating wells (FPWs) or wells that screen a large portion of the aquifer. The selection of a proper design for such PPW systems requires thorough understanding of the hydraulic characteristics of the subsurface and the well hydraulics of the PPW itself.

In this thesis, the use of PPWs in heterogeneous aquifers to obtain more efficient well designs is investigated. In practice, a proper design of such well-systems requires insight in the spatial variability of the hydraulic properties of the aquifer system. Installation and completion of wells based on poor hydrogeologic characterisation of the subsurface could result in less favourable conditions for the individual abstraction or injection wells, as well as for the operational processes and conditions of the entire well system. In particular, this thesis focusses on the optimisation of the well design for the following two well applications:

  1. Minimise the overall hydraulic impact of construction dewatering systems with artificial recharge PPWs.
  2. Minimise the buoyancy impact on the thermal recovery efficiencies of seasonal high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (HT-ATES) systems.
Start date and time
20 January 2020 16:15
End date and time
20 January 2020 17:00
PhD candidate
Jan van Lopik
Dissertation
Design of recharge and abstraction well systems in heterogeneous aquifers: modeling and experimental studies
PhD supervisor(s)
prof. dr. ing. Ruud Schotting
Co-supervisor(s)
dr. Amir Raoofdr. Niels Hartog