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When AI disrupts privacy and non-discrimination law

GDS webinar with Sandra Wachter: “The (im)possibility of algorithmic fairness"

Ethics of AI © iStockphoto.com/PayPau
© iStockphoto.com/PayPau

The GDS webinar series, an online seminar series, is organised by our Special Interest Group (SIG) coordinators. They have each invited a leading expert in their research field to enlighten us about the different aspects of governing the digital society. Once a month you will have the opportunity to tune in via our GDS Team or the link to the public stream we will share in Teams and here on our website.

Webinar the 26th of January

On the 26th of January the SIG "Principles by Design: towards good data practice”, coordinated by Karin van Es, Machiko Kanetake and Lucky Belder will host a webinar from 12.00-13.00 starring professor Sandra Wachter. Professor Wachter is an Associate Professor and Senior Research Fellow in Law and Ethics of AI, Big Data, and robotics as well as Internet Regulation at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. Sandra will talk about the (im)possibility of algorithmic fairness: When AI disrupts privacy and non-discrimination law.

Governing artificial systems

Artificial intelligence and machine learning have become an integral part of our daily lives. Algorithms are making important decisions ranging from job and loan applications, university admissions, medical diagnosis and treatment plans to sentencing criminals. This technology bears the potential for time and cost efficient and more consistent decision making. At the same time algorithms are known to be black boxes that are often privacy-invasive, biased and inexplicable. This means we are facing a major accountability gap. Humans and algorithms are very different in the way they make decisions.

Unfortunately, the legal tools available (e.g. data protection and non-discrimination law) were designed to govern humans, not artificial systems, and thus fail to protect us against those novel risks. I will examine regulatory frameworks that are ill-equipped to keep biased algorithms in check and I will shed light what can be done from a regulatory perspective to prevent biased, discriminatory, unintended, or socially undesirable outcomes. 

Professor Wachter’s talk will be based on, among others, the following publications:

  • Why Fairness Cannot Be Automated: Bridging the Gap Between EU Non-Discrimination Law and AI - For more information, click here
  • Affinity Profiling and Discrimination by Association in Online Behavioural Advertising - For more information, click here
  • A Right to Reasonable Inferences: Re-Thinking Data Protection Law in the Age of Big Data and AI - For more information, click here

 

About professor Wachter 

Professor Sandra Wachter is an Associate Professor and Senior Research Fellow in Law and Ethics of AI, Big Data, and robotics as well as Internet Regulation at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. Professor Wachter is specialising in technology-, IP-, data protection and non-discrimination law as well as European-, International-, (online) human rights,- and medical law. Her current research focuses on the legal and ethical implications of AI, Big Data, and robotics as well as profiling, inferential analytics, explainable AI, algorithmic bias, diversity, and fairness, governmental surveillance, predictive policing, and human rights online.

Governing the Digital Society

This webinar series is organized by the Utrecht University focus area Governing the Digital Society. Governing the Digital Society promotes research on the social processes of datafication, algorithmisation and platformisation. The focus area's basic research inquiry revolves around the question: How to develop and apply principles of (good) governance in digital societies?

Start date and time
End date and time
Location
Online in Teams (direct link to the stream)