20 November 2018 from 15:30 to 17:00

Speakers are Jip van Besouw and Teun Tieleman

Descartes Centre History of Science Colloquium

Speakers are Dr Jip van Besouw (Vrije Universiteit Brussel) and Prof. Teun Tieleman (History of Philosophy). 

Revisiting the Leiden Cabinet of Physics: machines and the mash of natural philosophy

The instruments of Willem Jacob ’s Gravesande (1688-1742) and Petrus van Musschenbroek (1692-1761), collected in Rijksmuseum Boerhaave, are generally considered as teaching devices meant to visualize the natural philosophical theories of Isaac Newton. Although various instruments were indeed used for such purposes, analyses of the intellectual contexts of other objects shows that many of the later additions were used to create new knowledge. Focusing on a group on machines used to investigate the forces of water, Van Besouw will show that ’s Gravesande and Van Musschenbroek were particularly interested in physically simulating practical water situations, thus bridging between theoretical discourse and engineering issues. To do so, they had to combine and reconfigure conceptual and experimental approaches from several disciplines. This talk will examine, first, how ’s Gravesande and Van Musschenbroek were creating a peculiar kind of knowledge and, second, how this knowledge stretched and sometimes breached the boundaries and conventions of contemporary natural philosophy.

Jip van Besouw 

Jip van Besouw
Jip van Besouw

Jip van Besouw is a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for Logic and Philosophy of Science of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, where he received his PhD in 2017, and a Research Fellow of the Descartes Centre. His research centres on the development of experimental and mathematical practices in seventeenth and eighteenth-century natural philosophy, as well as on the methodological and epistemological discourses of that time.

 

Anchoring Innovation in the Graeco-Roman World

Today innovation is a buzzword. But it is still predominantly associated with technology, medicine and the natural sciences, much less so with the Humanities. In this talk Teun Tieleman will present a new research program entitled ‘Anchoring Innovation’, which is led and carried out by a consortium of Dutch classicists. Why does classical antiquity provide a promising area for research into innovation processes, both successful and failed? What role is played by the notion of anchoring? What is the significance of the program for the humanities at large? Teun Tieleman will illustrate his presentation with various examples, in particular from his own field, ancient medicine.

Teun Tieleman 

Prof. dr. Teun Tieleman
Prof. dr. Teun Tieleman

Teun Tieleman (PhD 1992) is Professor of Ancient Philosophy and Medicine at Utrecht University. His research focuses on ancient Stoicism, classical emotion theory, ancient medicine, most notably Galen, and the way that philosophy was taught and transmitted in the classical world. He is e.g. director of the NWO-project ‘Human Nature: Medical and Philosophical Perspectives in the work of Galen of Pergamum,’ and member of the Board of the Gravitation Program ‘Anchoring Innovation.’

Image from the bottom panel of the title page to the 1541 Junta edition of Galen's Works. Depicts Galen demonstrating that the recurrent laryngeal nerves render an animal voiceless when cut. Source: Wikimedia
Image from the bottom panel of the title page to the 1541 Junta edition of Galen's Works. Depicts Galen demonstrating that the recurrent laryngeal nerves render an animal voiceless when cut. Source: Wikimedia
Start date and time
20 November 2018 15:30
End date and time
20 November 2018 17:00